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Home > Press > Johns Hopkins nanobio summer internship helps undergrads learn research ropes

REU student Kayode Sanni, 3rd from left, traveled with PI assistant prof. Jeff Gray, center, and the entire Gray Lab to the RosettaCON 2009 conference in Leavenworth, WA, where Sanni presented his research poster. (Gray Lab/JHU)
REU student Kayode Sanni, 3rd from left, traveled with PI assistant prof. Jeff Gray, center, and the entire Gray Lab to the RosettaCON 2009 conference in Leavenworth, WA, where Sanni presented his research poster. (Gray Lab/JHU)

Abstract:
Summertime flies by when it is spent hard at work in a laboratory; but the 12 student researchers selected for Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) still had plenty of fun. Here are highlights of their experience working, living, and playing at Johns Hopkins University this summer. INBT's NanoBio REU is funded by the National Science Foundation.

Johns Hopkins nanobio summer internship helps undergrads learn research ropes

Baltimore, MD | Posted on December 2nd, 2009

Ten weeks of intensive research

Each REU student conducted research for 10 weeks in the lab of an INBT affiliated faculty member who served as their principle investigator (PI). Students were mentored by a graduate student or postdoctoral fellow in the faculty member's lab and developed research projects that could be feasibly completed within this time. Findings were presented at a collaborative poster session. (See section below.)

"When I came to Johns Hopkins, I expected people to be more cutthroat about their work. What I found was that people are very serious about their work, but at the same time they were laid back, approachable and helpful, which made it even better. I would recommend this program to anyone." ~Alex Federation, University of Rochester

"I had previously planned to just get my master's degree and stop, but I had such a great experience that I am now considering getting my PhD." ~ Ranjini Krishnamurthy, Johns Hopkins University

Beyond the lab

To expose the REU students to concepts and ideas beyond the laboratory, INBT hosted four professional development seminars during June and July. Anyone on campus was welcome to attend these seminars. REU participants had the opportunity to listen to professionals discuss wide-ranging topics. Talks covered intellectual property, how to market a new technology, how science makes it into the news, and what to expect after graduation. These hour-long talks featured speakers John Fini, director of Intellectual Property for the Homewood schools; Charles Day, senior editor at Physics Today; Tim Weihs, professor of Materials Science and Engineering and co-founder of Reactive NanoTechnologies (makers of NanoFoil®); and Matthew Lesho, Biomedical Engineer with Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems and Hopkins alumnus.

"My lab was great. Everyone was hard working but at the same time they joked around so that made it fun. I enjoyed INBT's professional development seminars because they gave insight to subjects outside of basic science." ~ Chao Yin, Duke University

Unique opportunities

Students integrated fully into the labs where they worked. Research completed by an REU participant could be published on its own, or become part of published work via their PI at some point in the future-and this is a goal. Principle investigators and mentors work with students to quickly design projects of scientific merit so that research is not merely an exercise, but fulfills the goal of being a "research experience for undergraduates." INBT labs to which students are assigned engage in some of the most advanced nanobiotechnology research in the world. Some students may be able to travel to scientific conferences to present their findings. Even without this opportunity, however, INBT's REU participants truly learn what the life of a researcher is like.

Laboratory tours

The students had an opportunity to tour the Molecular Imaging Center and Cancer Functional Imaging Core, located in the Broadway Research Building Animal Facility at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The Molecular Imaging Center contains facilities for PET and SPECT scans, MRI and spectroscope, ultrasound, optical imaging, a "faxitron" radiography system and an irradiator. A collection of small research animals used for research also is housed in this building. Elena Artemova, administrative coordinator for the center, provided the students with a comprehensive tour.

Collaborative poster session

At the conclusion of the REU program, participants gathered with other research students from across the John Hopkins University campus for an interdisciplinary research poster session at the School of Medicine. More than 80 students from four divisions, including engineering, medicine, arts and science, and public health, presented posters at this session.

"I learned a lot and definitely learned how to be a researcher. I gained a better appreciation for the amount of work that goes into each research project." ~ Stefanie Gonzalez, Milwaukee School of Engineering

"It was challenging and I consider that fun. Originally I was only interested in neuroscience, but through this project, I was exposed to the field of epigenetics so that is something I am willing to pursue. It definitely changed my perception about what I wanted to do." ~ Olusoji Afuwape, University of Illinois at Chicago

Enjoying life in Baltimore

Baltimore is a city rich in cultural diversity, and there is always plenty to do. INBT's summer nanobio REU students saw the Baltimore Orioles play basebal, enjoyed pizza parties and ice cream socials, and had a chance to try some authentic Maryland steamed crabs. They also got to make friends from different parts of the country who were interested in different disciplines. The REU program provides housing, a stipend, and organized group activities with other summer research program participants so that students have the opportunity to meet people from different backgrounds.

"INBT's summer REU program is a great way to have networking opportunities with other students, to be interdisciplinary in your research and to learn about different areas of research that you had not thought about before." ~ Amber Ortega, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

"Although working in a lab with a principle investigator like Doug Robinson was really intense, it pushed me to my limit and I learned a lot. Also the city aspect was nice since I have lived in a small town all my life. There is a lot of culture in Baltimore and that's what I like." ~ Lawrence Lin, Rice University

Meet all of INBT 2009 summer nanobio REU students: inbt.jhu.edu/education/undergraduate/reu/2009/students.

For more information about the INBT Nanobio REU: inbt.jhu.edu/education/undergraduate/reu.

Story by Mary Spiro

####

About Johns Hopkins
The Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Johns Hopkins University brings together 193 researchers from: Bloomberg School of Public Health, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, School of Medicine, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Whiting School of Engineering to create new knowledge and new technologies at the interface of nanoscience and medicine.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
For media inquiries contact:
Mary Spiro

410 516-4802

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