Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Researchers can precisely manipulate polarization in nanostructures

Manipulation of the polarization in nanostructures. In Figure a, the researchers created an artificial star; in Figure b there is a diamond pattern.
Manipulation of the polarization in nanostructures. In Figure a, the researchers created an artificial star; in Figure b there is a diamond pattern.

Abstract:
Data storage with very high data densities on the horizon

Researchers can precisely manipulate polarization in nanostructures

The Netherlands | Posted on October 26th, 2009

Researchers from the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente, working with American researchers, have succeeded in using an electrical signal to control both the elastic and the magnetic properties of a nanomaterial at a very localized level. This opens up new possibilities for data storage with very high data densities. Their findings are to be published in November in the leading scientific journal Nature Nanotechnology.

In what are known as 'multiferroic' materials, the electrical, magnetic and elastic properties of the material are coupled. These materials make it possible to create new, complex structures that are suitable for e.g. data storage. Until recently, nobody had succeeded in controlling these multiferroic properties, but researchers from Oakridge National Laboratory (USA), the University of California, Berkeley (USA), Pennsylvania State University (USA) and the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology demonstrate in the next issue of Nature Nanotechnology that it is indeed possible.

In their experiments, the scientists succeeded in manipulating a nanostructure made of bismuth ferrate (BiFeO3) in an ordered way using scanning probe microscopy. This is a technique in which a surface can be manipulated at the atomic scale, using a miniscule needle.

By applying an electrical voltage to the needle and moving it over the surface of the material, the scientists are able to 'charge' a nanomaterial with different elastic and magnetic properties at a very localized level. This opens new avenues for data storage with very high information densities.

Notes for the press

The article 'Deterministic control of ferroelastic switching in multiferroic materials' by N. Balke, S. Jesse, A. P. Baddorf, S. V. Kalinin (ORNL), Y. H. Chu, R. Ramesh (UC Berkeley), S. Choudhury and L. Q. Chen (Penn State) and M. Huijben (MESA+) will appear in the November issue of Nature Nanotechnology. We can send you the publication as a PDF file by e-mail.

####

About University of Twente
The University of Twente is an entrepreneurial research university. It is the only campus University in the Netherlands and provides academic education and research in a wide variety of fields, for example from psychology to public administration and applied physics to biomedical technology. The University of Twente is part of the 3TU.Federation and works cooperatively with Delft University of Technology and Eindhoven University of Technology. The University of Twente is also a member of the European Consortium of Innovative Universities.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Joost Bruysters
+31 (0)53‑489‑2773

Copyright © University of Twente

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

Possible Futures

Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires October 20th, 2014

Superconducting circuits, simplified: New circuit design could unlock the power of experimental superconducting computer chips October 18th, 2014

Nanocoatings Market By Product Is Expected To Reach USD 8.17 Billion By 2020: Grand View Research, Inc. October 15th, 2014

Perpetuus Carbon Group Receives Independent Verification of its Production Capacity for Graphenes at 140 Tonnes per Annum: Perpetuus Becomes the First Manufacturer in the Sector to Allow Third Party Audit October 7th, 2014

Memory Technology

Strengthening thin-film bonds with ultrafast data collection October 23rd, 2014

Superconducting circuits, simplified: New circuit design could unlock the power of experimental superconducting computer chips October 18th, 2014

Future computers could be built from magnetic 'tornadoes' October 14th, 2014

Research mimics brain cells to boost memory power September 30th, 2014

Announcements

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE