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Home > News > How Nanotechnology Can Make Food Work (and Smell) Better

July 28th, 2009

How Nanotechnology Can Make Food Work (and Smell) Better

Abstract:
One way to improve foods is to isolate specific ingredients to make them more beneficial to the body. For instance, the Globe cites butyric acid, an ingredient found in milk, which can potentially help prevent cancer in the colon but usually doesn't make it all the way to the colon and smells like baby throw-up. David McClements of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst is working to coat the acid so that it will be broken down only when it reaches the organ, and without the bad smell.

Source:
wsj.com

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