Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Carnegie Mellon's Katayun Barmak Develops Novel

Katayun Barmak, a professor of materials science and engineering
Katayun Barmak, a professor of materials science and engineering

Abstract:
Carnegie Mellon University's Katayun Barmak, with the help of Microscopy Lab Supervisor Thomas Nuhfer, is one of the first materials scientists worldwide to successfully map polycrystalline structures on a nanoscale.

Carnegie Mellon's Katayun Barmak Develops Novel

Pittsburg, PA | Posted on June 9th, 2009

This mapping ability has come at the same time that Barmak, a professor of materials science and engineering, and her colleagues found that physical properties of some structures change at the nanoscale.

"This is a revolutionary research finding that will forever change the way we map polycrystalline structures of all the materials we use daily in our lives," said Greg Rohrer, head of Carnegie Mellon's Materials Science and Engineering Department.

Polycrystalline structures are made up of three-dimensional patterns of atoms, ions and molecules called crystals, which take on a range of orientations in space. It is the homogeneous solid crystallites and the boundaries between them that Barmak is mapping.

"I'm on the verge of harnessing the 'Wild West' as I drill down to analyze crystalline materials a thousand times smaller than the diameter of a human eyelash," Barmak said.

Her research, for example, shows that the minute grain boundaries of crystalline materials can obstruct the flow of an electric charge when subject to an electric field.

"Because we can now monitor these changes in structure and form at the nanoscale level, we can begin to see how metallic elements like copper can be tailored to be an even better conductive agent," said Barmak, who is also a member of the university's Materials Research, Science and Engineering Center.

Industry analysts report that better understanding of nanoscale structures can help make superior materials that are more economical to produce.

"I can see major impacts from our work for a whole host of engineered systems that harness nanotechnology," Barmak added. She said some examples of those important systems include silicon chips and data storage systems, photovoltaics and fuel cells, and medical devices and drug delivery systems.

####

About Carnegie Mellon University
Carnegie Mellon University is a global research university of more than 10,000 students, 70,000 alumni, and 4,000 faculty and staff. Recognized for its world-class arts and technology programs, collaboration across disciplines and innovative leadership in education, Carnegie Mellon is consistently a top-ranked university.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Chriss Swaney
412-268-5776

Copyright © Carnegie Mellon University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Advantest to Exhibit at SEMICON Korea in Seoul, South Korea February 4-6 Showcasing Broad Portfolio of Semiconductor Products, Technologies and Solutions January 29th, 2015

Park Systems Announces Innovations in Bio Cell Analysis with the Launch of Park NX-Bio, the only 3-in-1 Imaging Nanoscale Tool Available for Life Science Researchers January 29th, 2015

2015 Nanonics Image Contest January 29th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use MOFs to Eliminate Dye Pollutants January 29th, 2015

Possible Futures

GS7 Graphene Sensor maybe Solution in Fight Against Cancer January 25th, 2015

Nanotechnology in Energy Applications Market Research Report 2014-2018: Radiant Insights, Inc January 15th, 2015

'Mind the gap' between atomically thin materials December 23rd, 2014

A novel method for identifying the body’s ‘noisiest’ networks November 19th, 2014

Chip Technology

Creating new materials with quantum effects for electronics January 29th, 2015

Advantest to Exhibit at SEMICON Korea in Seoul, South Korea February 4-6 Showcasing Broad Portfolio of Semiconductor Products, Technologies and Solutions January 29th, 2015

Nanometrics to Present at the Stifel 2015 Technology, Internet and Media Conference January 27th, 2015

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Memory Technology

Nano - "Green" metal oxides ... January 13th, 2015

Quantum optical hard drive breakthrough January 8th, 2015

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Switching to spintronics: Berkeley Lab reports on electric field switching of ferromagnetism at room temp December 17th, 2014

Nanomedicine

Made-in-Singapore rapid test kit detects dengue antibodies from saliva: IBN's MedTech innovation simplifies diagnosis of infectious diseases January 29th, 2015

Iranian Researchers Planning to Produce Edible Insulin January 28th, 2015

Nanoparticles that deliver oligonucleotide drugs into cells described in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics January 28th, 2015

Nanoliposomes Help Efforts to Cure Bacterial Infections January 27th, 2015

Announcements

Advantest to Exhibit at SEMICON Korea in Seoul, South Korea February 4-6 Showcasing Broad Portfolio of Semiconductor Products, Technologies and Solutions January 29th, 2015

Park Systems Announces Innovations in Bio Cell Analysis with the Launch of Park NX-Bio, the only 3-in-1 Imaging Nanoscale Tool Available for Life Science Researchers January 29th, 2015

2015 Nanonics Image Contest January 29th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use MOFs to Eliminate Dye Pollutants January 29th, 2015

Energy

Los Alamos Develops New Technique for Growing High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells: Researchers’ crystal-production insights resolve manufacturing difficulty January 29th, 2015

Carbon nanoballs can greatly contribute to sustainable energy supply January 27th, 2015

Visualizing interacting electrons in a molecule: Scientists at Aalto University and the University of Zurich have succeeded in directly imaging how electrons interact within a single molecule January 26th, 2015

Iranian Researchers Boost Solar Cells Efficiency Using Anti-Aggregates January 26th, 2015

Fuel Cells

New concept of fuel cell for efficiency and environment: It grasps both performance efficiency and removal of toxic heavy metal ions in direct methanol fuel cells January 5th, 2015

Toward a low-cost 'artificial leaf' that produces clean hydrogen fuel December 3rd, 2014

Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals November 28th, 2014

National Synchrotron Light Source II Achieves 'First Light' October 23rd, 2014

Nanobiotechnology

Spider electro-combs its sticky nano-filaments January 28th, 2015

Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age January 26th, 2015

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers January 26th, 2015

DNA 'glue' could someday be used to build tissues, organs January 14th, 2015

Solar/Photovoltaic

Los Alamos Develops New Technique for Growing High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells: Researchers’ crystal-production insights resolve manufacturing difficulty January 29th, 2015

Visualizing interacting electrons in a molecule: Scientists at Aalto University and the University of Zurich have succeeded in directly imaging how electrons interact within a single molecule January 26th, 2015

Iranian Researchers Boost Solar Cells Efficiency Using Anti-Aggregates January 26th, 2015

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers January 26th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE