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Home > News > Colossal' Magnetic Effect Under Pressure

June 8th, 2009

Colossal' Magnetic Effect Under Pressure

Abstract:
Millions of people today carry around pocket-sized music players capable of holding thousands of songs, thanks to the discovery 20 years ago of a phenomenon known as the "giant magnetoresistance effect," which made it possible to pack more data onto smaller and smaller hard drives.

Now scientists are on the trail of another phenomenon, called the "colossal magnetoresistance effect" (CMR) which is up to a thousand times more powerful and could trigger another revolution in computing technology.

"The results imply that even at ambient conditions, the manganite might already have two separate magnetic phases at the nanometer scale, with pressure favoring the growth of the antiferro-magnetic phase at the expense of the ferromagnetic phase," says coauthor Daniel Haskel, a physicist at Argonne's APS.

"Manipulating phase separation at the nanoscale level is at the very core of nanotechnology and manganites provide an excellent playground to pursue this objective".

Source:
pddnet.com

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