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Home > Press > SLAC gets $68 million in stimulus money

Abstract:
SLAC National Acceleratory Laboratory will be on the receiving end of $68 million in federal stimulus money, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced Monday

SLAC gets $68 million in stimulus money

Stanford, CA | Posted on March 24th, 2009

Half of the money will go toward SLAC's premier project, the Linac Coherent Light Source, which will generate the world's brightest X-rays when it opens for business in September. The LCLS will capture snapshots of life at very small scales. Its ultrafast X-ray pulses, much like flashes from a high-speed strobe light, will enable scientists to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, shedding light on fundamental processes of biology, chemistry and technology.

The overall infusion of new funds, arising from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, will accelerate the acquisition of major research equipment for the LCLS and pay for seismic upgrades to SLAC infrastructure. The money will "provide much-needed modernization and construction of our facilities, while bringing new hope and jobs to the local economy," said SLAC Director Persis Drell.

Chu, a Nobel laureate, is a professor emeritus at Stanford and former chair of the university's Physics Department. He made his announcement during a visit to Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y. The $68 million heading toward SLAC is part of $1.2 billion allocated under the Recovery Act for the Energy Department's Office of Science.

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About Stanford University
The synthesis of teaching and research is fundamental to Stanford. All faculty do scholarly research, most often in association with graduate students or advanced undergraduates. Stanford is noted for multidisciplinary research within its schools and departments, as well as its independent laboratories, centers and institutes. Several national research centers are located at Stanford, including the Department of Plant Biology in the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the National Bureau of Economic Research.

There are more than 4,500 externally sponsored projects throughout the university, with the total budget for sponsored projects at $1.060 billion during 2008-09, including the SLAC National Linear Laboratory (SLAC). Of these projects, the federal government sponsors approximately 85.7 percent, including SLAC. In addition, nearly $150.2 million in support comes from non-federal funding sources. More than 4,000 graduate students and many undergraduates are involved in sponsored research at the university.

Stanford’s Office of Technology Licensing (OTL) brings technology created at Stanford to market. In 2007–08, Stanford received more than $62.5 million in gross royalty revenue from 344 technologies. Thirty-six of the 344 inventions generated $100,000 or more in royalties. Three inventions generated $1 million or more. In 2007–08, OTL concluded 107 new licenses and evaluated about 400 new invention disclosures in 2008.

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