Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Jumbo 'nanotube' existence confirmed at Sandia/LANL nanotech center

JUMBO TUBES -- a scanning electron microscope image (left) of a huge carbon tube. Images at right depict cross-sectional view of the tube, with rectangular pore tunnels visible in its wall. (photo by Sandi/LANL Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies)
JUMBO TUBES -- a scanning electron microscope image (left) of a huge carbon tube. Images at right depict cross-sectional view of the tube, with rectangular pore tunnels visible in its wall. (photo by Sandi/LANL Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies)

Abstract:
A jumbo nanotube, like a jumbo shrimp, sounds contradictory.

A giant lightweight carbon nanotube with good strength and electrical properties is desirable, all right. A micron-sized carbon tube is easier to exploit commercially than any (so to speak) littler nanocousin.

Jumbo 'nanotube' existence confirmed at Sandia/LANL nanotech center

ALBUQUERQUE, NM | Posted on December 18th, 2008

But is it still a nanotube?

Jianyu Huang at the joint Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), with colleagues elsewhere, got around this problem by naming their new creation "colossal carbon tubes" in a paper published in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.

"The structures are remarkable because they are very light, possess good electrical conductivity, and mechanical properties similar to carbon fibers," Huang says.

Among possibilities of use are so-called textile electronics and body armor.

Because of their strange, surprising sponginess — walls of graphite-like carbon kept apart by hollow, rectangular compartments — the colossal fibrous tubes are 20 times less dense than carbon fibers, yet about the same length — in the centimeter range. And they appear to be slightly stronger — a very desirable, and until now unheard-of property in large carbon tubes.

The new form of carbon surprised leading nanotechnology researchers. MIT's carbon technology specialist Mildred Dresselhaus was quoted in an online news article in the journal Nature: "This is a new form of carbon that was unexpected to me."

Huang, who did the microstructure analysis confirming that the walls of such tubes consist of graphitic structure, describes the new creation as "a porous, giant, carbon fiber-like tubular structure" of diameters ranging from 40 to 100 microns. Conventional carbon nanotubes are about 10 nanometer diameter.

The material was made at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Researchers there led by Yuntian Zhu and Huisheng Peng found that heating ethylene and paraffin oil produced a carbon vapor that condensed into tubes of pure carbon tens of microns wide and up to several centimeters long. Zhu now is at North Carolina State University, and Huisheng Peng is at Tongji University in Shanghai.

####

About Sandia National Laboratories
Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, Calif., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and economic competitiveness.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Neal Singer

(505) 845-7078

Copyright © Sandia National Laboratories

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Small but heading for the big time: Nanobiotix half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2015, in line with expectations: Major clinical achievements and corporate developments August 28th, 2015

A new technique to make drugs more soluble August 28th, 2015

Nanocatalysts improve processes for the petrochemical industry August 28th, 2015

Nanolab Technologies LEAPS Forward with High-Performance Analysis Services to the World: Nanolab Orders Advanced Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) Microscope from CAMECA Unit of AMETEK Materials Analysis Division August 27th, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Developing Component Scale Composites Using Nanocarbons August 26th, 2015

Southampton scientists find new way to detect ortho-para conversion in water August 25th, 2015

Revolutionary MIT-Developed Nanotechnology Company Showcases at CAMX in Dallas August 20th, 2015

Engineering a better 'Do: Purdue researchers are learning how August 4th, 2015

Discoveries

A new technique to make drugs more soluble August 28th, 2015

Nanocatalysts improve processes for the petrochemical industry August 28th, 2015

CWRU researchers efficiently charge a lithium-ion battery with solar cell: Coupling with perovskite solar cell holds potential for cleaner cars and more August 27th, 2015

Successful boron-doping of graphene nanoribbon August 27th, 2015

Announcements

Small but heading for the big time: Nanobiotix half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2015, in line with expectations: Major clinical achievements and corporate developments August 28th, 2015

A new technique to make drugs more soluble August 28th, 2015

Nanocatalysts improve processes for the petrochemical industry August 28th, 2015

Nanolab Technologies LEAPS Forward with High-Performance Analysis Services to the World: Nanolab Orders Advanced Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) Microscope from CAMECA Unit of AMETEK Materials Analysis Division August 27th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic