Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > News > Teaching Nano to Swim

October 14th, 2008

Teaching Nano to Swim

Abstract:
Ayusman Sen, head of the Department of Chemistry at Penn State, makes tiny, metallic objects do something extraordinary -- he makes them swim. Sen's work is driven by catalysis, the chemical phenomenon whereby a substance accelerates a chemical reaction but emerges unchanged at the end of the process.

The chemical reaction upon which he and his team of students and colleagues focus their efforts is the well-known redox reaction, in which electrons and protons are broken away from their parent atoms and are pumped back and forth between substances, resulting in the liberation of energy during the process.

That energy manifests itself as an electrical gradient in the fluid surrounding a micro particle or nanomotor. Frequently, the motor is one of the group's two-micron-long platinum-gold nanorods. In most cases, the fluid starts out as a dilute solution of hydrogen peroxide which, upon being catalytically oxidized by the platinum tip of a nanorod, results in oxygen and also in electrons and protons that flow from bow to stern; electrons inside the rod; and an equal number of protons in the fluid along the outside of the rod. At the stern, the electrons and protons catalytically reduce hydrogen peroxide to water. The protons flowing from stem to stern function like paddles propelling the nanorod toward its platinum forward end, or if the nanorod is stationery, pumping water around it toward the aft end.

Source:
physorg.com

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

President Obama Meets U.S. Laureates of 2014 Kavli Prizes August 1st, 2014

Stanford researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design: Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes August 1st, 2014

Air Force’s 30-year plan seeks 'strategic agility' August 1st, 2014

Chemistry

Nanostructured metal-oxide catalyst efficiently converts CO2 to methanol: Highly reactive sites at interface of 2 nanoscale components could help overcome hurdle of using CO2 as a starting point in producing useful products July 31st, 2014

Nature inspires a greener way to make colorful plastics July 30th, 2014

Tough foam from tiny sheets: Rice University lab uses atom-thick materials to make ultralight foam July 29th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Use Waste Cotton Fibers to Produce Cellulose Nanoparticles July 29th, 2014

Discoveries

Iranian Scientists Produce Cobalt–Alumina Ceramic Nano Inks August 1st, 2014

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

Taking the guesswork out of cancer therapy: New molecular test kit predicts patient’s survival and drug response August 1st, 2014

Carnegie Mellon Chemists Create Nanofibers Using Unprecedented New Method July 31st, 2014

Announcements

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

President Obama Meets U.S. Laureates of 2014 Kavli Prizes August 1st, 2014

Stanford researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design: Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes August 1st, 2014

Air Force’s 30-year plan seeks 'strategic agility' August 1st, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE