Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Northeastern University Scientists Discover Rapid, Cost-Effective, 100% Recyclable Method to Produce Ultra-strong Magnets

(a) A low and (b)high magnification TEM image of the SmCo nanoblades. (c) HRTEM image showing the growth direction of the blade is [100] (perpendicular to the (200) planes), and one of the surface plane parallel to the growth direction is the {001} plane. (d) The electron diffraction pattern from the nanoblade shown in (c) indicating that the blade is orientated along the [010] zone axis, and is consistent with the HRTEM image, showing the SmCo5 phase.
(a) A low and (b)high magnification TEM image of the SmCo nanoblades. (c) HRTEM image showing the growth direction of the blade is [100] (perpendicular to the (200) planes), and one of the surface plane parallel to the growth direction is the {001} plane. (d) The electron diffraction pattern from the nanoblade shown in (c) indicating that the blade is orientated along the [010] zone axis, and is consistent with the HRTEM image, showing the SmCo5 phase.

Abstract:
Innovative Processing Method Set to Bring Changes to Federal and Commercial Industries

Northeastern University Scientists Discover Rapid, Cost-Effective, 100% Recyclable Method to Produce Ultra-strong Magnets

Boston, MA | Posted on July 28th, 2008

Ultra-strong, high-temperature, high-performance permanent magnet compounds, such as Samarium Cobalt, are the mainstay materials for several industries that rely on high-performance motor and power generation applications, including the Department of Defense (DOD) and the automotive industry. Until now, producing Samarium Cobalt has been a difficult and expensive multi-step process. Northeastern University researchers have broken new ground with an innovative invention of a rapid, high-volume and cost-effective one-step method for producing pure Samarium Cobalt rare earth (RE) permanent magnet materials.

Invented by lead scientist C.N. Chinnasamy, Ph.D., at Northeastern's Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials, the direct chemical synthesis process is able to produce Samarium Cobalt rapidly and in large amounts, at a small fraction of the cost of the current industry method. Also, the process is environmentally friendly, with 100% recyclable chemicals, and readily scalable to large volume synthesis to meet the needs for the myriad of advanced permanent magnet applications. The study describing the invention is published in the latest issue of Applied Physics Letters (July 28, 2008).

"A single step chemical process has been pursued for decades with little success," said Vincent Harris, William Lincoln Smith Chair Professor and Director of the Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits at Northeastern University and Principal Investigator of the program. "This research breakthrough represents a potentially disruptive step forward in the cost-effective processing of these important materials."

Samarium Cobalt magnets are superior to other classes of permanent magnetic materials for advanced high-temperature applications and the Northeastern invention goes beyond the currently known fabrication process of these nanostructured magnets. Unlike the traditional multi-step metallurgical techniques that provide limited control of the size and shape of the final magnetic particles, the Northeastern scientists' one-step method produces air-stable "nanoblades" (elongated nanoparticles shaped like blades,) that allow for a more efficient assembly that may ultimately result in smaller and lighter magnets without sacrificing performance. Northeastern University has filed an international patent application on the synthesis, size, shape and structure controlled RE-TM based nanocomposites particles and production of high energy product RE-TM nanocrystalline permanent magnets.

"Such unusually shaped particles should prove valuable in the processing of anisotropic magnets that are highly sought in many DOD and commercial applications and are anticipated to lead to lighter and more energy-efficient end products," said C.N. Chinnasamy. We also produced size, shape and structure controlled Rare earth (RE)-Transition metal nanoparticles directly and production of high emergy products are under process.

"Northeastern's new one-step process has the potential to reduce complexity
and associated costs of processing Samarium Cobalt magnets, which are used in
many advanced DOD weapon systems," said Richard T. Fingers, Ph.D., Chief, Energy Power Thermal Division of the Air Force Research Laboratory.

Underscoring the significance of the Northeastern invention relative to the high-performance rare earth magnet industry, Jinfang Liu, Ph.D., Vice President of Technology and Engineering at Electron Energy Corporation, a leading developer of permanent magnetic materials, added, "The development of stable Samarium Cobalt nanoparticles using this one-step chemical synthesis method may motivate more scientist and engineers to work on the development of next generation magnets."

This revolutionary invention is anticipated to not only revitalize the permanent magnet industry, it has the potential to bring major changes to several federal and commercial industries, including its potential to impact the size, weight, and performance of aircraft, ships, and land-based vehicles, as well as contribute to more efficient computer technologies and emerging biomedical applications.

"This work represents the most promising advance in rare earth permanent magnet processing in many years," said Laura Henderson Lewis, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Northeastern University and a collaborator on this project. "I expect it to revitalize international interest in the development of this important class of engineering materials."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
C. N. Chinnasamy (Chins) Ph.D
Research Scientist
Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials & Integrated Circuits
Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering
440 DANA
360 Huntington Avenue
Northeastern University
Boston MA 02115
USA
Also at:134 Egan Research Center
Northeastern University
Boston MA 02115 USA
Tel.: 617.373.5185


Copyright © Northeastern University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

Amorphous Coordination Polymer Particles as alternative to classical nanoplatforms for nanomedicine October 30th, 2014

Marine/Watercraft

First Observation of Electronic Structure in Ag-Rh Alloy Nanoparticles Having Hydrogen Absorbing: Storage Property –Attempting to solve the mystery of why Ag-Rh alloy nanoparticles have a similar property to Pd– October 30th, 2014

Engineered proteins stick like glue — even in water: New adhesives based on mussel proteins could be useful for naval or medical applications September 22nd, 2014

NRL Researchers Develop Harder Ceramic for Armor Windows April 29th, 2014

Discoveries

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

Materials/Metamaterials

Production of Biocompatible Polymers in Iran October 30th, 2014

New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat: SunShot Project aims to make solar cost competitive October 29th, 2014

Watching the hidden life of materials: Ultrafast electron diffraction experiments open a new window on the microscopic world October 27th, 2014

Polymeric Scaffold Recreates Bladder Tissue October 27th, 2014

Announcements

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

Automotive/Transportation

Production of Anticorrosive Chromate Nanocoatings in Iran September 27th, 2014

Teijin Aramid’s carbon nanotube fibers awarded with Paul Schlack prize: New generation super fibers bring wave of innovations to fiber market September 25th, 2014

Next-Gen Luxury RV From Global Caravan Technologies Will Offer MagicView Roof and Windshield Using SPD-SmartGlass Technology From Research Frontiers: Recreational Vehicle Manufacturer Global Caravan Technologies (GCT) Features 28 Square Feet of MagicView™ SPD-SmartGlass September 17th, 2014

Toward making lithium-sulfur batteries a commercial reality for a bigger energy punch September 17th, 2014

Aerospace/Space

New evidence for an exotic, predicted superconducting state October 27th, 2014

Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested: New Rocket Propellant and Motor Design Offers High Performance and Safety October 23rd, 2014

Removal of Limitations of Composites at Superheat Temperatures October 20th, 2014

1980s aircraft helps quantum technology take flight October 20th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE