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Home > News > CIO Symposium looks at five technology forces

March 29th, 2008

CIO Symposium looks at five technology forces

Abstract:
The Greater Dallas Chamber presented "Five Technology Forces Driving the Future" Thursday night. The seminar was the first of three planned for 2008 as a part of the CIO Symposium Series, sponsored by Chapman, Inc., the IT consulting and executive search company.

The night opened with Dave Turtletaub, CEO of Capstone, expressing hope that the symposium would discuss key issues that "meet the needs of IT executives" and help "advance the technology industry." In order to achieve this, three additional speakers were planned to discuss Infotech, Ecotech, Nanotechnology, Biotech, and Robotics.

First up was Jeff Wacker, Director of Corporate Strategy and Fellow/Futurist for Electronic Data Systems Corporation. Wacker touched on ecotech but primarily discussed how each of the symposium's five technologies work together, although not always harmoniously. It is the intersection of these technologies, he stressed, that truly shapes the world. However, no one can predict what the future holds, but instead can rely on possibilities and probabilities to build and grow a business.

Dr. John Randall, Vice President of Zyvex Labs, spoke next about nanotechnology. Anything that has a feature smaller than 100 nanometers is considered a part of the nano movement. Candy, socks, pants and even cars have features measured on a nano scale. The tiny nature of nano has the potential to mass produce atomically precise manufacturing, or structurally perfect objects. But for now, atomically precise manufacturing is still being perfected.

Source:
pegasusnews.com

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