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Home > News > Tech company grows from Clemson incubator

March 22nd, 2008

Tech company grows from Clemson incubator

Abstract:
Selah Technologies in Pendleton could be considered an Innoventure success story.

In 2006, CEO and President Michael Bolick went to Innoventure at the request of a friend.

"A buddy of mine said you need to go to Innoventure. He said they put all sorts of interesting people together and mix them up and see what happen," he said. "Last year, I basically presented to the community the fact that we had found the technology and where we were to that point. This year, we're ready to take our product to the global marketplace."

Basing the company on research developed at Clemson University, Mr. Bolick chose to use his background in pharmaceutical manufacturing to create a new advanced materials company.

The Pendleton-based company makes Selah Dots, a carbon-based nanotechnology that could replace fluorescent dyes used in medical diagnoses, and Selah Tubes, which could be instrumental in helping other companies turn TVs from rigid displays to flexible ones.

"Selah Technologies recognized early on that an entire company could be developed around this technology," said Chris Prziremble, vice president of research and economic development at Clemson University. "Together Clemson and Selah have a mutually beneficial relationship. We realized we shared a set of core values of moving these technologies into the market place both in a very professional manner and an ethical manner."

Source:
independentmail.com

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