Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > NRL scientists produce carbon nanotubes using commercially available polymeric resins

Images of (A,B) shaped CNT solids monoliths, (C) shards, and (D) powders derived from said monoliths.

Credit: Naval Research Laboratory
Images of (A,B) shaped CNT solids monoliths, (C) shards, and (D) powders derived from said monoliths.

Credit: Naval Research Laboratory

Abstract:
Scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have successfully produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in high yields in bulk solid compositions using commercially available aromatic containing resins. The concentration of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and metal nanoparticles can be easily varied within the shaped carbonaceous solid. Carbon nanotube containing fibers and films have also been formulated from the precursor compositions. The potential range of applications is huge, including structure, energy, sensors, separation/filtration, battery, electronic displays, and nanoelectronic devices.

NRL scientists produce carbon nanotubes using commercially available polymeric resins

Washington, DC | Posted on February 7th, 2008

Using this method, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are formed in a bulk carbonaceous solid from thermal decomposition of melt-processable precursor compositions formulated from organometallic compounds or metal salts in the presence of an excess amount of selected highly aromatic compounds. The CNTs obtained by this patented method are not formed from gaseous components, as is common with the current CNT production based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, but rather evolve from metal and carbon nanoparticles that form within the carbonaceous solid during the carbonization process above 500°C. Only a small amount of the organometallic compound or metal salt is needed to achieve the formation of CNTs in high yield, but large quantities of the metal source can be used, depending on the application, if desired.

The solid-state method enables the large-scale production of MWNTs in moldable solid forms, films, and fibers using low-cost precursors and equipment, thereby reducing economic barriers that are inherent with carbon nanotube materials produced by more conventional methods, such as CVD. Following carbonization, the shaped carbon solids are composed of varying amounts of nanotubes and amorphous carbon, depending on such synthetic parameters as the metal catalyst concentration, carbonization temperature, and the specific organic precursors used. The amorphous carbon phase is readily removed via selective combustion at temperatures from 300-500 °C, producing highly porous, purified CNT solids with specific surface areas up to 500 m2 g-1. This highly flexible synthetic method also offers the ability to incorporate heteroatoms, for example nitrogen, oxygen, and/or boron, into the carbon nanotube solid via the initial carbon precursors.

The NRL scientists use standard resin melt processing techniques to produce various shaped CNT-containing carbonaceous configurations. Their research is the first example of using high temperature thermosetting resins as a carbon source for the formation of CNTs. Any commercially available resins, including phthalonitriles resins, polyimides, epoxy resins, phenolics, and petroleum pitches, that have good thermal properties and show superior structural integrity, are attractive sources of carbon for CNT formation by the novel method.

The use of commercially available resins is a potentially inexpensive route to CNTs. Using this simple, potentially cost-effective method could result in the production of CNTs in large quantities and various shapes. Scientists are evaluating them for possible use in numerous aerospace, marine, and electronic applications.

The NRL research team consists of Drs. Teddy Keller, Matthew Laskoski, and Jeff Long from the Chemistry Division and Dr. Syed Qadri from the Materials Science and Technology Division. The research is funded by NRL base funds provided by the Office of Naval Research.

####

About Naval Research Laboratory
NRL operates as the Navy's full-spectrum corporate laboratory, conducting a broadly based multidisciplinary program of scientific research and advanced technological development directed toward maritime applications of new and improved materials, techniques, equipment, systems and ocean, atmospheric, and space sciences and related technologies. In fulfillment of this mission, NRL:

* Initiates and conducts broad scientific research of a basic and long-range nature in scientific areas of interest to the Navy.

* Conducts exploratory and advanced technological development deriving from or appropriate to the scientific program areas.

* Within areas of technological expertise, develops prototype systems applicable to specific projects.

* Assumes responsibility as the Navy’s principal R&D activity in areas of unique professional competence upon designation from appropriate Navy or DOD authority.

* Performs scientific research and development for other Navy activities and, where specifically qualified, for other agencies of the Department of Defense and, in defense-related efforts, for other Government agencies.

* Serves as the lead Navy activity for space technology and space systems development and support.

* Serves as the lead Navy activity for mapping, charting, and geodesy (MC&G) research and development for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA).

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Donna McKinney

202-767-2541

Copyright © Naval Research Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Compact, Low Cost, Accurate: Mini Positioning Stages, by PI June 30th, 2015

NEI Announces the Issuance of Multiple Patents on Self-Healing & Superhydrophobic Coatings June 30th, 2015

Philips Introduces Quantum Dot TV with Color IQ™ Technology from QD Vision: Manufacturer is first to offer quantum dot displays for both TVs and monitors June 30th, 2015

Oxford Instruments’ TritonXL Cryofree dilution refrigerator selected for the Oxford NQIT Quantum Technology Hub project June 30th, 2015

Laboratories

X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time: New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions June 29th, 2015

Helium 'balloons' offer new path to control complex materials June 27th, 2015

Opening a new route to photonics Berkeley lab researchers find way to control light in densely packed nanowaveguides June 27th, 2015

Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive manufacturing June 24th, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3-D June 17th, 2015

Researchers grind nanotubes to get nanoribbons: Rice-led experiments demonstrate solid-state carbon nanotube 'templates' June 15th, 2015

Environmental Issues to Hamper Growth of Global Nanocomposites Market June 4th, 2015

Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) Market Trends, Segments And Forecasts To 2022: Grand View Research, Inc June 1st, 2015

Discoveries

Carnegie Mellon chemists characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels: Methods will allow researchers to develop new 'smart' materials June 30th, 2015

Chitosan coated, chemotherapy packed nanoparticles may target cancer stem cells June 30th, 2015

Graphene flexes its electronic muscles: Rice-led researchers calculate electrical properties of carbon cones, other shapes June 30th, 2015

Researchers from the UCA, key players in a pioneering study that may explain the origin of several digestive diseases June 30th, 2015

Announcements

BASF and Fraunhofer IPMS-CNT jointly develop electronic materials June 30th, 2015

Graphene flexes its electronic muscles: Rice-led researchers calculate electrical properties of carbon cones, other shapes June 30th, 2015

Researchers from the UCA, key players in a pioneering study that may explain the origin of several digestive diseases June 30th, 2015

Oxford Instruments’ TritonXL Cryofree dilution refrigerator selected for the Oxford NQIT Quantum Technology Hub project June 30th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project