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Home > News > Fine print: New technique allows fast printing of microscopic electronics

January 29th, 2008

Fine print: New technique allows fast printing of microscopic electronics

Abstract:
A new technique for printing extraordinarily thin lines quickly over wide areas could lead to larger, less expensive and more versatile electronic displays as well new medical devices, sensors and other technologies. Solving a fundamental and long-standing quandary, chemical engineers at Princeton developed a method for shooting stable jets of electrically charged liquids from a wide nozzle. The technique, which produced lines just 100 nanometers wide, offers at least 10 times better resolution than ink-jet printing and far more speed and ease than conventional nanotechnology.

Source:
chemie.de

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