Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Lasing on the spot

Figure 1: The artificial atom laser. (a) The design of the laser based on a superconducting ‘island’ made from a small dot of aluminum. The break up of the superconducting electron pairs (blue dots) releases energy into the resonator where laser light is generated. (b) Two spots of laser radiation generated by the device.
Figure 1: The artificial atom laser. (a) The design of the laser based on a superconducting ‘island’ made from a small dot of aluminum. The break up of the superconducting electron pairs (blue dots) releases energy into the resonator where laser light is generated. (b) Two spots of laser radiation generated by the device.

Abstract:
Lasing from 'artificial atoms' is demonstrated for the first time

Lasing on the spot

Japan | Posted on January 25th, 2008

Researchers from RIKEN's Frontier Research System in Wako, in collaboration with the NEC Nano Electronics Research Laboratory in Tsukuba, have realized the first laser made from ‘artificial atoms' based on a superconducting electronic device.

Since their invention almost half a century ago, lasers have always been based on the interaction of atoms with light. Typically, a number of atoms, either a gas or a crystal, are placed between two mirrors that form a cavity. The interaction between the atoms and the light in the cavity then leads to the creation of laser radiation. As the coupling between the atoms and the light in the cavity is generally very weak, many atoms are required to make a laser and lasing only occurs beyond a certain threshold of energy that needs to be pumped into the system.

Reporting in the journal Nature1, the researchers have now demonstrated a laser that is based on a single artificial atom and has no lasing threshold. In contrast to conventional lasers, "the strong coupling between the artificial atoms and the cavity enables a new lasing regime where one atom produces many light particles," notes Oleg Astafiev from the research team.

At the heart of this new laser is the artificial atom that is made from a small superconducting aluminum ‘island' (Fig. 1). This island is coupled to a reservoir, which is used to tune its properties and thus optimize the laser. When a small electrical voltage is applied to the island, the pairs of electrons that form the superconducting state are forced to break up and leave the island through the drain.

The energy that is released by breaking up these pairs is converted into light and fed into the resonator cavity. Contrary to conventional lasers, the coupling between the island and the resonator is very strong, so lasing is achieved immediately and without any threshold. This process of light generation can be repeated many times such that a single atom creates many photons for the laser.

The artificial-atom laser offers a number of opportunities. In particular, "this laser may be used to study the fundamental physical properties of this simplest of possible laser systems, consisting of only one atom," comments Astafiev. Furthermore, the small amount of power required to achieve lasing in this system could lead to the development of arrays of these small and compact lasers on a single computer chip.
Reference

1. Astafiev, O., Inomata, K., Niskanen, A. O., Yamamoto, T., Pashkin, Yu. A., Nakamura, Y. & Tsai, J. S. Single artificial-atom lasing. Nature 449, 588-590 (2007).

####

About Lasing on the spot
RIKEN is one of Japan’s largest research organisations with institutes and centres in various locations in Japan (see www.riken.jp/engn/r-world/link/index.html). RIKEN’s 3000+ researchers publish several hundred research articles in top scientific and technical journals every year across a broad spectrum of disciplines in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, earth science and in many areas of technology, and the number of articles is growing year on year.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198
TEL : +81-(0)48-462-1111(Switchboard Number)
FAX : +81-(0)48-462-4713

Copyright © RIKEN

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Rutgers, NIST physicists report technology with potential for sub-micron optical switches March 31st, 2015

Prototype 'nanoneedles' generate new blood vessels in mice: Scientists have developed tiny 'nanoneedles' that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice March 31st, 2015

Super sensitive measurement of magnetic fields March 31st, 2015

Nanomedicine pioneer Mauro Ferrari at ETH Zurich March 31st, 2015

Chip Technology

Rutgers, NIST physicists report technology with potential for sub-micron optical switches March 31st, 2015

Next important step toward quantum computer: Scientists at the University of Bonn have succeeded in linking 2 different quantum systems March 30th, 2015

State-of-the-art online system unveiled to pinpoint metrology software accuracy March 27th, 2015

SUNY POLY CNSE to Host First Ever Northeast Semi Supply Conference (NESCO) Conference Will Connect New and Emerging Innovators in the Northeastern US and Canada with Industry Leaders and Strategic Investors to Discuss Future Growth Opportunities in NYS March 25th, 2015

Discoveries

Rutgers, NIST physicists report technology with potential for sub-micron optical switches March 31st, 2015

Prototype 'nanoneedles' generate new blood vessels in mice: Scientists have developed tiny 'nanoneedles' that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice March 31st, 2015

Super sensitive measurement of magnetic fields March 31st, 2015

From tobacco to cyberwood March 31st, 2015

Announcements

Rutgers, NIST physicists report technology with potential for sub-micron optical switches March 31st, 2015

Prototype 'nanoneedles' generate new blood vessels in mice: Scientists have developed tiny 'nanoneedles' that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice March 31st, 2015

Super sensitive measurement of magnetic fields March 31st, 2015

Nanomedicine pioneer Mauro Ferrari at ETH Zurich March 31st, 2015

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Rutgers, NIST physicists report technology with potential for sub-micron optical switches March 31st, 2015

Super sensitive measurement of magnetic fields March 31st, 2015

Next important step toward quantum computer: Scientists at the University of Bonn have succeeded in linking 2 different quantum systems March 30th, 2015

Solving molybdenum disulfide's 'thin' problem: Research team increases material's light emission by twelve times March 29th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE