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Home > Press > ISIS Second Target Station -- protons on target!

A 6000 tonne steel and concrete structure surrounds the new new neutron source. High energy protons strike a tungsten target at the centre to release neutrons for experiments
A 6000 tonne steel and concrete structure surrounds the new new neutron source. High energy protons strike a tungsten target at the centre to release neutrons for experiments

Abstract:
The ISIS Second Target Station Project at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire achieved a major milestone on Friday 14 December, at the first attempt and two days ahead of schedule. Protons were successfully extracted into the new proton transfer beamline from the existing ISIS accelerator and delivered to the new target station.

ISIS Second Target Station -- protons on target!

UK | Posted on December 18th, 2007

The 140 million Second Target Station Project will double the capacity of the world-leading ISIS research centre and significantly increase its capability for nanoscience applications. It will open for experiments in Autumn 2008 and is expected to operate for at least 20 years.

The high energy beam of protons will be used to release neutrons from a tungsten target. By scattering these neutrons off sample materials, scientists can visualise the positions and motions of atoms. The technique is non-destructive and can be used to study everything from delicate biological specimens to priceless archaeological artefacts.

Professor Keith Mason, CEO of the Science and Technology Facilities Council said "The ISIS Second Target Station will keep us at the forefront of materials research, enabling UK scientists to make breakthroughs that will underpin the next generation of super-fast computers, data storage, sensors, pharmaceutical and medical applications, materials processing, catalysis, biotechnology and clean energy technology."

During the test, bunches of protons travelling at 84% of the speed of light were transferred from the circular ISIS synchrotron accelerator into the 143m long proton beamline. They were guided by a sequence of 57 steering and focusing magnets onto a graphite test target located inside the new target station. The arrival of the protons was detected by measuring the electrical current induced in the target and the beam profiles along the length of the beam line were checked.

"The ISIS Second Target Station is a part of the much needed expansion of facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to meet modern science challenges across a range of research disciplines. The project is on time and on budget. Following a five year construction schedule, we expect to generate our first neutrons in June 2008 and open for experiments in the autumn of 2008." said ISIS Director Dr Andrew Taylor.

Notes for Editors

Images

Images showing the science that can be done at ISIS are available at http://www.stfc.ac.uk/PandS/Gallery/ISISbeauty.aspx

Images showing the construction of ISIS Second Target Station

Credit Stephen Kill/ISIS/STFC

Available from http://www.stfc.ac.uk/PMC/PRel/STFC/ISIS-TS2.aspx

* 07ec3318: Proton bunches are extracted from the circular synchrotron accelerator into the new beamline
* 07ec3366: Proton bunches travel at 84% of the speed of light along the proton beamline to the new target station
* 07ec3818: Expansion of the ISIS neutron source (foreground) at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire will open up new areas of research for UK scientists
* 07ec3562: A 6000 tonne steel and concrete structure surrounds the new new neutron source. High energy protons strike a tungsten target at the centre to release neutrons for experiments
* 07ec4165: The ISIS Second Target Station Project building

Images of the Proton Delivery

* 07ec4669: Friday 14 December 2007 14:57: Members of the ISIS Second Target Station Project celebrate the successful delivery of protons along the new proton transfer beamline.
* 07ec4668: Accelerator Physicists Dean Adams and Di Wright. Dean was responsible for the conceptual design of the beamline.
* 07ec4670: Signal trace measured from the graphite test target indicating the arrival of the proton bunch.
* 07ec4671: Signal traces of the proton beam passing through monitors along the beamline.

####

About Science and Technology Facilities Council
The Science and Technology Facilities Council ensures the UK retains its leading place on the world stage by delivering world-class science; accessing and hosting international facilities; developing innovative technologies; and increasing the socio-economic impact of its research through effective knowledge exchange partnerships.

The Council has a broad science portfolio including Astronomy, Particle Physics, Particle Astrophysics, Nuclear Physics, Space Science, Synchrotron Radiation, Neutron Sources and High Power Lasers. In addition the Council manages and operates three internationally renowned laboratories:

* The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire
* The Daresbury Laboratory, Cheshire
* The UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Edinburgh

The Council gives researchers access to world-class facilities and funds the UK membership of international bodies such as the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the European organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO) and the European Space Agency (ESA). It also contributes money for the UK telescopes overseas on La Palma, Hawaii, Australia and in Chile, and the MERLIN/VLBI National Facility, which includes the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory.

The Council distributes public money from the Government to support scientific research. Between 2007 and 2008 we will invest approximately 678 million.

ISIS Pulsed Neutron Source

ISIS is a world-leading centre for research in physical and life sciences operated by the Science and Technology Facilities Council at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire, UK.

ISIS supports an international community of around 1600 scientists who use neutrons and muons for research in physics, chemistry, materials science, geology, engineering and biology. It is the most productive pulsed neutron spallation source in the world.

The ISIS Second Target Station Project complements the facilities already operating at ISIS and enables the science programme to expand into the key research areas of soft matter, advanced materials and bio-science.

Neutron scattering is a vital research and analysis technique in exploring the structure and dynamics of materials and molecules. It provides unique and complementary information to that available from light sources, such as the Diamond synchrotron.

The experimental programme will begin in 2008.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Julia Maddock

01-793-442-094

Dr Martyn Bull
ISIS
Tel 01235 445 805
Mobile 07909 536983


Dr Andrew Taylor
ISIS Director
STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
Tel: +44 (0) 1235 446681

Copyright © Science and Technology Facilities Council

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

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