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Home > Press > Louisiana Tech professor is Small Times' Innovator of the Year

Dr. Yuri Lvov assists student Rohit Ghan with his work. Lvov was chosen by Small Times journal as the 2007 Innovator of the Year.
Dr. Yuri Lvov assists student Rohit Ghan with his work. Lvov was chosen by Small Times journal as the 2007 Innovator of the Year.

Abstract:
Dr. Yuri Lvov, a chemistry professor in Louisiana Tech's Institute for Micromanufacturing, has been named Small Times' 2007 Innovator of the Year, beating candidates from Princeton University and companies across the nation.

Louisiana Tech professor is Small Times' Innovator of the Year

Ruston, LA | Posted on December 5th, 2007

The results will be printed in the journal's January 2008 issue.

Lvov received the award based on his work related to important cancer drugs. His research pioneers drug reformulation through polyelectrolyte nano-encapsulation, which has allowed stable nano and micro colloids of cancer drugs. Lvov has used the same approach to improve cellulose microfibers from recycled paper through polyelectrolyte nanocoating, which has allowed increased recycled fiber usage in paper.

"Each year it gets more and more difficult to judge the best and brightest as the micro and nanotechnology market continues to mature and new products come to market," said Christine Shaw, senior vice president and group publisher of Small Times. "It is an honor to recognize the leading companies, and business and research executives who are driving integration of nanotechnology into the commercial pipeline."

Dr. Kody Varahramyan, director for the Institute for Micromanufacturing, said Lvov's area of specialization is nanotechnology, including nanoassembly of ultra thin organized films, bio/nanocomposites, nanoparticle ensembles, nano/construction of ordered shells on microtemplates, nanocapsules for drug and enzyme delivery and controlled release. Lvov has also published two books and has had more than 160 peer reviewed papers on these topics.

"This is a well-deserved award, recognizing Dr. Lvov's extensive scientific and technological contributions," Varahramyan said. "He is nationally and internationally known for his pioneering work in the area of nanotechnology, particularly as it relates to the layer-by-layer nanoassembly technique and its applications."

Lvov, who holds the Tolbert Pipes Eminent Endowed Chair on micro and nanosystems, said while he felt this achievement was a summation of his work, he expects to continue his research for many years.

"Of course, I hope to do something more," Lvov said. "Many, many people were considered. This award means Louisiana researchers are moving forward."

Louisiana Tech President Dan Reneau commended Lvov on his research and technological advances.

"Yuri Lvov is an excellent scientist and a very fine individual," Reneau said. "Louisiana Tech University is fortunate to have him as a professor."

Dr. Stan Napper, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said Lvov's willingness to collaborate with young faculty members in a variety of areas has helped boost interdisciplinary research within the university.

"His technology and scientific contributions have enabled so many of our researchers to develop innovations in a variety of areas," Napper said. "He freely shares his knowledge and has been very supportive of new faculty hires and has helped them become successes early in their careers."

Dr. Les Guice, vice president for research and development, said Lvov is a remarkable individual and one of the most prolific scientists in terms of his cited journal publications at Tech.

"What's really special about Yuri to me is he understands the innovative process of taking things he does into things industries are interested in," Guice said. "He provides leadership for us, and (this award) is an amazing demonstration of his technology. He can take this layer-by-layer assembly method and apply it to cancer drugs and pulp and paper to make it have better properties."

Guice added that Lvov is passionate about Tech and is a great asset to the university.

"Great people like him could go anywhere in the country," Guice said. "He has made a difference for us."

####

About Louisiana Tech University
The University’s Mission statement characterizes the relevance of research to the central purpose of the institution: “Louisiana Tech provides a technology-rich, interdisciplinary teaching, learning, and research environment to ensure student and faculty success...Recognizing that research and service are fundamental to its mission, Louisiana Tech recruits and retains a faculty who see research and teaching as intertwined, complementary, and interdisciplinary and who, through both theoretical and applied research and creative activities, contribute to the development of new knowledge, new art, and new technology.”

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Dave Guerin

318-257-4854

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