Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > News > Australian sensor 'looks at atoms'

November 27th, 2007

Australian sensor 'looks at atoms'

Abstract:
Bionic body parts and new pharmaceuticals may be easier to develop with the launch of a new Australian device that can see what's happening at the atomic level.

The Inphaze impedance spectrometer, which is the size of a shoebox, uses electricity to detect the structure of samples at the nanometer scale, and could replace larger measuring devices which cost hundreds of millions of dollars.

Speaking at the launch of Inphaze, University of Sydney Biophysics and Bioengineering director, Professor Hans Coster, said the spectrometer was unique because it provided a level of resolution not previously obtained by impedance spectrometers.

"With this instrument we can picture things with electrical currents that we cannot see otherwise. We have been able to resolve structures down to atomic dimensions, down to seeing the addition of a single carbon atom," he said.

Source:
brisbanetimes.com.au

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Sensors

Graphene oxide making any material suitable to create biosensors: Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have developed a new tool for biomedical research focused on single-cell investigation November 27th, 2017

The stacked color sensor: True colors meet minimization November 16th, 2017

Promising sensors for submarines, mines and spacecraft: MSU scientists are developing nanostructured gas sensors that would work at room temperature November 10th, 2017

Practical superconducting nanowire single photon detector with record detection efficiency over 90 percent November 9th, 2017

Announcements

UCLA chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heat: Tiny structures could be next-generation solution for smaller electronic devices December 8th, 2017

Untangling DNA: Researchers filter the entropy out of nanopore measurements December 8th, 2017

Device makes power conversion more efficient: New design could dramatically cut energy waste in electric vehicles, data centers, and the power grid December 8th, 2017

JPK Instruments announce partnership with Swiss company, Cytosurge AG. The partnership makes Cytosurge’s FluidFM® technology available on the JPK NanoWizard® AFM platform December 8th, 2017

Tools

Untangling DNA: Researchers filter the entropy out of nanopore measurements December 8th, 2017

JPK Instruments announce partnership with Swiss company, Cytosurge AG. The partnership makes Cytosurge’s FluidFM® technology available on the JPK NanoWizard® AFM platform December 8th, 2017

Researchers advance technique to detect ovarian cancer: Rice, MD Anderson use fluorescent carbon nanotube probes to achieve first in vivo success November 30th, 2017

Deben reports on a new publication from scientists at La Trobe University in Australia where their CT500 stage is used in micro scanning tomography experiments to better understand ceramic matrix composites under load November 29th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project