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Home > News > Stronger Than a Speeding Bullet

October 31st, 2007

Stronger Than a Speeding Bullet

Abstract:
Because today is Halloween, I thought it only appropriate that I dress up today's post a little and entitle it: "Stronger Than a Speeding Bullet." Now, I know the actual saying is "faster than a speeding bullet," but as I explain in my forthcoming book, Jump the Curve, if you are going to stay ahead of the exponential advances in technology you need to think differently.

A wonderful case in point comes compliments of this article explaining how scientists at the University of Sydney have developed a new carbon nanotube yarn that can deflect bullets traveling at speeds of up to 10,000 feet per second. But, unlike today's bullet-proof vests, the technology doesn't simply spread out the force of the bullet, it deflects it. The bullet, quite literally, bounces off the vest.

As I explained in this article I wrote for the Motley Fool last week, the trick for the exponential executive is open his or her mind to all the new applications that this technology (as well as other new emerging technologies) might soon create. For example, automobile manufacturers will soon be able to build stronger, lighter and safer cars. Wind turbines manufacturers will be able to create new wind turbines that are not only larger (and can thus generate more electricty), they will also be more effective at operating at lower wind speeds. (As an added benefit, carbon nanotube-enforced blades will also better withstand heavy winds). In short, carbon nanotubes can make a variety of existing technologies significantly better and, in the process, provide companies with a real competitive advantage. It is another example of what I call in my book, "walking the escalator"—or using an existing technology to improve a current product.

Source:
jumpthecurve.net

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