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Home > News > GE Looks at Nano to Power Next-Gen Solar In Historic R&D Labs of Thomas Edison

September 22nd, 2007

GE Looks at Nano to Power Next-Gen Solar In Historic R&D Labs of Thomas Edison

Abstract:
At General Electric, nanotechnology is seen as "the ultimate materials science," and holds a special power to change the fundamental landscape of the energy industry.

Today, GE's nano-researchers probe the promises of nanosciences in the successor facility to the historic R&D lab where GE's founder Thomas Edison unlocked the powers of electricity a century earlier and pioneers such as Langmuir and Blodgett established the field of surface science. Among GE's early discoveries are nano-ceramic materials to make lighter and higher-powered aircraft engines, nanofibers to build more effective windblades for wind power, and nanotechnologies to drive more economical and high-efficiency solar panels.

Nano World News speaks with GE's Loucas Tsakalakos, a project leader in GE's Nanotechnology Program and a member of the program's original team, to learn more about how GE sees nanoscience unlocking the power of the sun.

Source:
nsti.org

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