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Home > Press > The next generation: Nanomagnets could replace semiconductors

Abstract:
Computer Engineering Professor at UH Receives NSF Grant to Partner with UC-Riverside, Seagate Technology

The next generation: Nanomagnets could replace semiconductors

HOUSTON, TX | Posted on August 29th, 2007

Just as compact discs all but wiped out vinyl records, semiconductors could be on their way out, too.

A University of Houston professor has developed a similar ‘disruptive technology,' using magnetic cellular networks, that could yield such benefits as increased computing power that rivals what is possible with semiconductor integrated circuits.

Integrated circuits, which are a microscopic array of electronic circuits and components that have been implanted on the surface of a single chip of semiconducting material, have become the principal components of almost all electronic devices. Compared to the vacuum tubes and transistors that preceded them, integrated circuits have provided a low-cost, highly reliable way for computers to respond to a wider range of input and produce a wider range of output.

Dmitri Litvinov, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and of chemical and biomolecular engineering in the Cullen College of Engineering at UH, is working with specially arranged assemblies of nanomagnets, or magnetic cellular networks, to replace conventional circuitry and significantly improve computing operations. His research involves a system of interacting magnetic nanocells that could combine logic, random access memory and data storage in a single nanomagnetic computing system.

Working from logic gates, which are at the heart of a computer's ability to add, subtract, multiply and divide, Litvinov wants to demonstrate that the magnetization of adjacent magnets is possible and can be used to perform specific logic and computing operations, reversing the repulsive and attractive poles of magnets.

"The significance is potentially ultra-high density of magnetic computing components for significantly higher computing power beyond what is expected to be achievable with semiconductor integrated circuits," said Litvinov, who also is the director of the Center for Nanomagnetic Systems at UH. "Additional benefits include potential integration with magnetic random access memory that would result in all-magnetic computing, as well as extreme robustness, or resilience, against radiation that could be critical for space missions or military applications."

Funded by a $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation's Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) initiative, Litvinov, the principal investigator on this project, is working with co-PI Sakhrat Khizroev of the University of California-Riverside. The two have successfully implemented a number of nanomagnetic concepts and rapid prototyping approaches in commercial magnetic data storage systems, many of which are directly applicable to this project. Also involved in this research is co-PI Song Xue of Seagate Technology, a major American manufacturer of hard drives and the largest magnetic information technology company in the world. Xue is strategically positioned to deliver key technology components, such as access to advanced device fabrication, to facilitate this research and bring industrial insight to the project.

GOALI is a program that connects universities and industry for mutual benefit, reflecting the NSF's objective to improve the nation's capacity for intellectual and economic growth. Launched in 1993 and expanded in 1996 to include all NSF directorates, GOALI aims to improve productivity and enhance competitiveness. By the NSF serving as a catalyst for industry-university partnerships through this type of grant, it helps bring together intellectual capital and emerging technologies to improve quality of life, making funds available to support an eclectic mix of academic and commercial linkages.

"The long-term potential of developing integrated magnetic computing systems such as ours could foster a significant advance in information processing that rivals not just superconductors, but also the integrated circuit revolution of the past half century," Litvinov said. "It's an ideal fit with the NSF's GOALI initiative, since this program only funds projects with demonstrated interest from industry and seeks out projects such as ours with a potentially profound impact on the world's economic, political and social systems."

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About University of Houston
The University of Houston, Texas’ premier metropolitan research and teaching institution, is home to more than 40 research centers and institutes and sponsors more than 300 partnerships with corporate, civic and governmental entities. UH, the most diverse research university in the country, stands at the forefront of education, research and service with more than 35,000 students.

About the Cullen College of Engineering
UH Cullen College of Engineering has produced five U.S. astronauts, ten members of the National Academy of Engineering, and degree programs that have ranked in the top ten nationally. With more than 2,600 students, the college offers accredited undergraduate and graduate degrees in biomedical, chemical, civil and environmental, electrical and computer, industrial, and mechanical engineering. It also offers specialized programs in aerospace, materials, petroleum engineering and telecommunications.

For more information about UH, visit the university’s Newsroom at
http://www.uh.edu/newsroom .

To receive UH science news via e-mail, visit
http://www.uh.edu/admin/media/sciencelist.html .

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Lisa Merkl
713/743-8192 (office)
713/605-1757 (pager)

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