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Home > News > Motion control at the speed of a human hair

May 16th, 2007

Motion control at the speed of a human hair

Abstract:
Three Dutch organisations are collaborating to develop a motion control system that they hope will deliver motion and positioning accuracies that can be measured in nanometers. The technology will be able to work in three dimensions at speeds comparable to the rate of growth a human hair - 1nm/s.

The 4 million NewMotion project has attracted 1.2 million of funding from the EU-backed Stimulus programme that funds projects in the Eindhoven region. The three participants are the motion control specialist Nyquist Industrial Control, the Technical University of Eindhoven (TU/e), and FEI Electron Optics, a company that develops high-tech analytical systems for nanotechnology applications.

Source:
drives.co.uk

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