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Home > News > Military nanotechnology: nanocomposite could replace uranium in ammunitions

January 31st, 2007

Military nanotechnology: nanocomposite could replace uranium in ammunitions

Abstract:
Armor-piercing projectiles made of depleted uranium have caused concern among soldiers storing and using them. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are close to developing a new composite with an internal structure resembling fudge-ripple ice cream that is actually comprised of environmentally safe materials to do the job even better.

Source:
nanowerk.com

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