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Home > Press > World record holder joins Eikos

Guinness world record holder for world’s smallest test tube joins Eikos Inc. as senior engineer

Franklin, MA | Posted on February 02, 2006

Eikos, Inc., a developer and manufacturer of carbon nanotube (CNT) inks for highly conductive transparent coatings and circuits, recently hired Dr. David Britz as senior engineer.

Among his most notable accomplishments, David holds the 2005 Guinness World Record for creating the world’s smallest test tube, out of carbon nanotubes at the University of Oxford Department of Materials.

In his new position at Eikos, David will spearhead research and development focused on solar cells, specifically working on enhancing CNT layer performance in photovoltaic cells for the Department of Energy solar program.

Before joining Eikos, David was as a Doctor of Philosophy student at the University of Oxford Department of Materials. There he developed and characterized more than ten new carbon nanotube and fullerene-based materials and processes for nanoelectronics and quantum computing applications. In addition, he published eleven journal articles in field-leading journals, including Chemical Communications, Physical Review Letters and Accounts of Chemical Research.

Among his other scientific accomplishments, David received an Honorable Mention for the 2002 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, and the 2000 Harrison Undergraduate Research Award.

David earned his Doctorate of Philosophy in Materials Science from the University of Oxford Materials Department, ultimately writing his doctorate thesis on the “Structure and Bonding of Fullerenes and Nanotubes.” He earned a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science, graduating Magna Cum Laude.

He now lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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About Eikos:
Eikos, Inc. is a developer and manufacturer of highly transparent carbon nanotube inks for conductive coatings and circuits for use in solar cells, flat panel displays, OLED lighting, smart windows and other established markets. Eikos’ patented Invisicon® transparent conductors (‘nanowires’) will enable high volume, low cost production of a thinner, more flexible and more durable conductive coating technology that will displace Indium Tin Oxide (ITO), Zinc Oxide, PEDOT/PSS, and other transparent conductors. A privately held company headquartered in Franklin Massachusetts, Eikos has a number of licenses and development contracts with major global companies, U.S. military agencies and NASA.

For more information, please click here.

Contact:
Andrew Lavin
A. Lavin Communications
212-290-9540
andrewlavin@alavin.com

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