Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Smart materials: metal cations-recognizable thermoresponsive polymers: Osaka Metropolitan University scientists developed a novel polymer, the thermoresponsiveness of which can easily be regulated by changing the type and mixing ratio of ionic species

The novel thermoresponsive polymer was created by adding ions to polymers and aqueous solutions. Its thermoresponsiveness can easily be controlled by changing the type and mixing ratio of ionic species.

CREDIT
Harada, OMU
The novel thermoresponsive polymer was created by adding ions to polymers and aqueous solutions. Its thermoresponsiveness can easily be controlled by changing the type and mixing ratio of ionic species. CREDIT Harada, OMU

Abstract:
Often referred to as smart materials, temperature-responsive or thermoresponsive polymers are gaining attention for their ability to respond to external temperature changes, allowing for an extensive range of applications. Making this smart material even smarter by improving the flexibility of its response to temperature, Osaka Metropolitan University scientists have developed a novel polymer, the thermoresponsiveness of which can easily be regulated by changing the type and mixing ratio of ionic species. Their findings were published in Macromolecules.

Smart materials: metal cations-recognizable thermoresponsive polymers: Osaka Metropolitan University scientists developed a novel polymer, the thermoresponsiveness of which can easily be regulated by changing the type and mixing ratio of ionic species

Osaka, Japan | Posted on October 14th, 2022

Polymers that exhibit temperature-related change in their physicochemical properties are called thermoresponsive polymers. They include two types: polymers with lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) and polymers with upper critical solution temperatures (UCST). Above a certain temperature, the former are insoluble, whereas the latter are soluble. In LCST-type thermoresponsive polymers, as the temperature increases, the polymer–solvent interaction decreases and the polymer–polymer interaction becomes dominant, leading to precipitation of polymers from the solvent. Conversely, in UCST-type thermoresponsive polymers, as the temperature increases, the polymer–polymer interaction decreases and the polymer–solvent interaction becomes dominant, resulting in dissolution. This indicates the affinity between the polymer and the solvent as an important factor in most thermoresponsive polymers.

Conventionally, the polymer–solvent interaction is used to regulate thermoresponsiveness in designing thermoresponsive polymers. However, attention has recently focused on a new technique that regulates thermoresponsiveness by adding a third component. This technique often uses organic solvents, but to develop materials such as those for drug delivery systems, it is necessary that water, which is harmless to the human body, be used as the solvent.

The research team led by Professor Atsushi Harada from the Graduate School of Engineering at Osaka Metropolitan University used water as the solvent and developed an LCST-type thermoresponsive polymer by adding alkaline earth metal ions—which are divalent cations—to polymers and aqueous solutions. They succeeded in regulating thermoresponsive properties, simply by changing the species and mixing ratio of the ions. This is different from the conventional technique that can only regulate thermoresponsiveness by changing the structure of the polymers.

"We have developed a novel polymer that exhibits thermoresponsiveness in the presence of certain ions,” concluded Professor Harada. “We expect that it will be applied as an analytical reagent for metal ion-sensing devices and as a material for drug delivery systems."

####

About Osaka Metropolitan University
Osaka Metropolitan University is a new public university established by a merger between Osaka City University and Osaka Prefecture University in April 2022. For more research news, visit https://www.upc-osaka.ac.jp/new-univ/en-research/research/, or follow @OsakaMetUniv_en and #OMUScience.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ngoc Han Hoang
Osaka Metropolitan University

Copyright © Osaka Metropolitan University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

ARTICLE TITLE

Related News Press

News and information

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Possible Futures

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Danish quantum physicists make nanoscopic advance of colossal significance January 27th, 2023

UC Irvine researchers decipher atomic-scale imperfections in lithium-ion batteries: Team used super high-resolution microscopy enhanced by deep machine learning January 27th, 2023

Nanomedicine

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

New nanoparticles deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer’s gene in mice: UW researchers have found a way to move gene therapies through the blood-brain barrier, a crucial step for brain-wide CRISPR treatments of disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease January 20th, 2023

Team undertakes study of two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenides Important biomedical application, including biosensing December 9th, 2022

SLAC/Stanford researchers discover how a nano-chamber in the cell directs protein folding: The results challenge a 70-year-old theory of how proteins fold in our cells and have profound implications for treating diseases linked to protein misfolding December 9th, 2022

Discoveries

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Materials/Metamaterials

Trial by wind: Testing the heat resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites: Researchers use an arc-wind tunnel to test the heat resistance of carbon fiber reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites November 18th, 2022

Rice turns asphaltene into graphene for composites: ‘Flashed’ byproduct of crude oil could bolster materials, polymer inks November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

Semi-nonlinear etchless lithium niobate waveguide with bound states in the continuum November 4th, 2022

Announcements

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Department of Energy announces $9.1 million for research on quantum information science and nuclear physics: Projects span the development of quantum computing, algorithms, simulators, superconducting qubits, and quantum sensors for advancing nuclear physics January 27th, 2023

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Danish quantum physicists make nanoscopic advance of colossal significance January 27th, 2023

Nanobiotechnology

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

New nanoparticles deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer’s gene in mice: UW researchers have found a way to move gene therapies through the blood-brain barrier, a crucial step for brain-wide CRISPR treatments of disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease January 20th, 2023

Team undertakes study of two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenides Important biomedical application, including biosensing December 9th, 2022

SLAC/Stanford researchers discover how a nano-chamber in the cell directs protein folding: The results challenge a 70-year-old theory of how proteins fold in our cells and have profound implications for treating diseases linked to protein misfolding December 9th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project