Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > UNC Charlotte-led team invents new anticoagulant platform, offering hope for advances for heart surgery, dialysis, other procedures

RNA-DNA nanofibers have been designed to bind and inactivate thrombin and due to their size have a prolonged circulation in bloodstream. This induced anticoagulation process can be reversed by the kill switch mechanism that also results in production of smaller complexes for accelerated renal excretion.
CREDIT
UNC Charlotte
RNA-DNA nanofibers have been designed to bind and inactivate thrombin and due to their size have a prolonged circulation in bloodstream. This induced anticoagulation process can be reversed by the kill switch mechanism that also results in production of smaller complexes for accelerated renal excretion. CREDIT UNC Charlotte

Abstract:
While blood clotting is important to prevent blood loss and for our immunity, coagulation also can cause health issues and even death. Currently, one in four people worldwide dies from diseases and conditions caused by blood clots. Meanwhile, anticoagulants used to reduce risks can also cause significant issues, such as uncontrolled bleeding.

UNC Charlotte-led team invents new anticoagulant platform, offering hope for advances for heart surgery, dialysis, other procedures

Charlotte, North Carolina | Posted on July 15th, 2022

Now, a new biomolecular anticoagulant platform invented by a team led by UNC Charlotte researcher Kirill Afonin holds promise as a revolutionary advancement over the blood thinners currently used during surgeries and other procedures. The team’s discoveries are reported in the journal Nano Letters, first available online on July 5.

“We envision the uses of our new anticoagulant platform would be during coronary artery bypass surgeries, kidney dialysis, and a variety of vascular, surgical and coronary interventions,” Afonin said. “We are now investigating if there are potential future applications with cancer treatments to prevent metastasis and also in addressing the needs of malaria, which can cause coagulation issues.”

The paper shares the most recent results from three years of collaboration among researchers with the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory), University of São Paulo in Brazil, The Pennsylvania State University, and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

“All this resulted in a massive international and interdisciplinary effort to develop a completely new technology that we think may revolutionize the field and be picked up by other areas of health research,” Afonin said.

The team’s technology turns to programmable RNA-DNA anticoagulant fibers that, when injected into the bloodstream, form into modular structures that communicate with thrombin, which are the enzymes in blood plasma that cause blood to clot. The technology allows the structures to prevent blood clotting as it is needed, then be swiftly eliminated from the body by the renal system once the work is done.

The fiber structures use aptamers, short sequences of DNA or RNA designed to specifically bind and inactivate thrombin.

“Instead of having a single small molecule that deactivates thrombin,” Afonin said, “we now have a relatively large structure that has hundreds of the aptamers on its surface that can bind to thrombin and deactivate them. And because the structure becomes larger, it will circulate in the bloodstream for a significantly longer time than traditional options.”

The extended circulation in the bloodstream allows for a single injection, instead of multiple doses. The design also decreases the concentration of anticoagulants in the blood, resulting in less stress on the body’s renal and other systems, Afonin said.

This technology also introduces a novel “kill-switch” mechanism. A second injection reverses the fiber structure’s anticoagulant function, allowing the fibers to metabolize into materials that are tiny, harmless, inactive and easily excreted by the renal system.

The entire process takes place outside the cell, through extracellular communication with the thrombin. The researchers note that this is important as immunological reactions do not appear to occur, based on their extensive studies.

The team has tested and validated the platform using computer models, human blood and various animal models. “We conducted proof-of-concept studies using freshly collected human blood from donors in the U.S. and in Brazil to address a potential inter donor variability,” Afonin said.

The technology may provide a foundation for other biomedical applications that require communication via the extracellular environment in patients, he said. “Thrombin is just one potential application,” he said. “Whatever you want to deactivate extracellularly, without entering the cells, we believe you can. That potentially means that any blood protein, any cell surface receptors, maybe antibodies and toxins, are possible.”

The technique permits the design of structures of any shape desired, with the kill switch mechanism intact. “By changing the shape, we can have them go into different parts of the body, so we can change the distribution,” Afonin said. “It gets an extra layer of sophistication of what it can do.”

While the application is sophisticated, production of the structures is relatively easy. “The shelf life is amazingly good for these formulations,” Afonin said. “They’re very stable, so you can dry them, and we anticipate they will stay for years at ambient temperatures, which makes them very accessible to economically challenged areas of the world.”

While the researchers’ work so far has relevance for short-term applications, such as in surgeries, they hope to possibly extend their research into maintenance situations, such as with medications that patients with heart conditions take.

The potential for saving lives and improving health care is a motivator for the team, as is inventing something new, Afonin said. “We can learn from nature, but we have built something that has never been introduced before,” he said. “So, we develop and build all these platforms de novo – from scratch. And then we can explain through our platforms what we want nature – or our bodies – to do and our bodies understand us.”

UNC Charlotte's Office of Research Commercialization and Development is working closely with Penn State to patent and bring this new technology to market.

Afonin, professor with the Nanoscale Science Doctoral Program in the Department of Chemistry at UNC Charlotte, is the paper’s corresponding author. Other authors are: Weina Ke of UNC Charlotte, Morgan Chandler of UNC Charlotte, Edward Cedrone of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Renata F. Saito of the University of São Paulo, Maria Cristina Rangel of the University of São Paulo, Mara de Souza Junqueira of the University of São Paulo, Jian Wang of Penn State, Da Shi of Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Nguyen Truong, of UNC Charlotte, Melina Richardson of UNC Charlotte, Lewis A. Rolband of UNC Charlotte, Didier Dréau of UNC Charlotte, Peter Bedocs of Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Roger Chammas of UNC Charlotte, Nikolay V. Dokholyan of Penn State, and Marina A. Dobrovolskaia of Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Jason Vaughan
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Office: 704-687-1750

Copyright © University of North Carolina at Charlotte

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

ARTICLE TITLE

Related News Press

News and information

Drawing data in nanometer scale September 30th, 2022

Researchers unveil mystery inside Li- o2 batteries September 30th, 2022

Synthesis of air-stable room-temperature van der Waals magnetic thin flakes September 30th, 2022

ACM Research Launches New Furnace Tool for Thermal Atomic Layer Deposition to Support Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing Requirements: Ultra Fn A Furnace Tool Shipped to China-Based Foundry Customer September 30th, 2022

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Drawing data in nanometer scale September 30th, 2022

New technique allows researchers to scrape beyond the surface of nanomaterials: Using a new secondary-ion mass spectrometry technique, research are getting a fresh look at MXenes and MAX phases September 23rd, 2022

Solvent study solves solar cell durability puzzle: Rice-led project could make perovskite cells ready for prime time September 23rd, 2022

Heat-resistant nanophotonic material could help turn heat into electricity: The key to beating the heat is degrading the materials in advance September 23rd, 2022

Possible Futures

Researchers unveil mystery inside Li- o2 batteries September 30th, 2022

Synthesis of air-stable room-temperature van der Waals magnetic thin flakes September 30th, 2022

Layer Hall effect and hidden Berry curvature in antiferromagnetic insulators September 30th, 2022

ACM Research Launches New Furnace Tool for Thermal Atomic Layer Deposition to Support Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing Requirements: Ultra Fn A Furnace Tool Shipped to China-Based Foundry Customer September 30th, 2022

Nanomedicine

Cleveland researchers reveal new strategy to prevent blood clots without increasing the risk of bleeding: University Hospitals and Case Western Reserve University findings may be especially impactful for cancer patients who experience blood clot complications September 30th, 2022

Georgia State researchers discover novel way to treat IBD with lipid nanoparticles August 26th, 2022

Engineers fabricate a chip-free, wireless electronic “skin”: The device senses and wirelessly transmits signals related to pulse, sweat, and ultraviolet exposure, without bulky chips or batteries August 19th, 2022

Immune system: First image of antigen-bound T-cell receptor at atomic resolution: Antigen binding does not trigger any structural changes in T-cell receptors – Signal transduction probably occurs after receptor enrichment August 19th, 2022

Discoveries

Surface microstructures of lunar soil returned by Chang’e-5 mission reveal an intermediate stage in space weathering process September 30th, 2022

Researchers unveil mystery inside Li- o2 batteries September 30th, 2022

Synthesis of air-stable room-temperature van der Waals magnetic thin flakes September 30th, 2022

Layer Hall effect and hidden Berry curvature in antiferromagnetic insulators September 30th, 2022

Announcements

Researchers unveil mystery inside Li- o2 batteries September 30th, 2022

Synthesis of air-stable room-temperature van der Waals magnetic thin flakes September 30th, 2022

Layer Hall effect and hidden Berry curvature in antiferromagnetic insulators September 30th, 2022

ACM Research Launches New Furnace Tool for Thermal Atomic Layer Deposition to Support Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing Requirements: Ultra Fn A Furnace Tool Shipped to China-Based Foundry Customer September 30th, 2022

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Conformal optical black hole for cavity September 30th, 2022

Cleveland researchers reveal new strategy to prevent blood clots without increasing the risk of bleeding: University Hospitals and Case Western Reserve University findings may be especially impactful for cancer patients who experience blood clot complications September 30th, 2022

Ultrasmall VN/Co heterostructure with optimized N active sites anchored in N-doped graphitic nanocarbons for boosting hydrogen evolution September 30th, 2022

Layer Hall effect and hidden Berry curvature in antiferromagnetic insulators September 30th, 2022

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Drawing data in nanometer scale September 30th, 2022

Multi-institution, $4.6 million NSF grant to fund nanotechnology training September 9th, 2022

Scientists take control of magnetism at the microscopic level: Neutrons reveal remarkable atomic behavior in thermoelectric materials for more efficient conversion of heat into electricity August 26th, 2022

Understanding outsize role of nanopores: New research reveals differences in pH, and more, about these previously mysterious environments August 26th, 2022

Nanobiotechnology

Cleveland researchers reveal new strategy to prevent blood clots without increasing the risk of bleeding: University Hospitals and Case Western Reserve University findings may be especially impactful for cancer patients who experience blood clot complications September 30th, 2022

Georgia State researchers discover novel way to treat IBD with lipid nanoparticles August 26th, 2022

Rice team eyes cells for sophisticated data storage: National Science Foundation backs effort to turn living cells into equivalent of computer RAM August 19th, 2022

Engineers fabricate a chip-free, wireless electronic “skin”: The device senses and wirelessly transmits signals related to pulse, sweat, and ultraviolet exposure, without bulky chips or batteries August 19th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project