Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Jet-printing microfluidic devices on demand

Abstract:
Jet-printing microfluidic devices on demand1 – a new paper from engineering and biomedical scientists at the University of Oxford and spin-out company iotaSciences Ltd – describes a game-changing method to generate cell-friendly microfluidic devices on demand. This innovative protocol offers significant benefits to biology and biomedicine, enabling simple, contactless fabrication of microfluidic circuits in minutes – almost as quickly as the circuit pattern can be drawn on paper – using truly cell-friendly materials; standard Petri dishes and culture media.

Jet-printing microfluidic devices on demand

Oxford, UK | Posted on November 6th, 2020

The pioneering jet-printing method stems from the recognition that gravity becomes irrelevant at the microscale. In the everyday world, objects are invariably made with solids; building complex structures out of liquids, which would collapse into puddles and drain away, is not feasible. Using microjets to fabricate microfluidic devices takes advantage of the interfacial forces that dominate in the microworld. In this paper, the method was used to successfully clone cells by limiting dilution in a way that beats the Poisson limit, to subculture adherent cells, and to feed arrays of cells continuously for a week in sub-microliter chambers. Liquid flows were driven through conduits with and without external pumps, and circuits reconfigured to open and close ‘fluidic valves’ at will. The diversity and flexibility of this approach is expected to lead to widespread adoption of the technique for a variety of applications in biomedicine.

1 Soitu, C, Stovall-Kurtz, N., Deroy, C., Castrejón-Pita, A.A., Cook, P.R., and Walsh, E.J. (2020). Jet-printing microfluidic devices on demand. Advanced Science 10.1002/advs.202001854.

####

About iotaSciences
This research was supported by iotaSciences, a spin-out company from the University of Oxford. iotaSciences is exploiting biomicrofluidic technology to deliver innovative solutions for biological workflows, including single-cell cloning for cell line development.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sarah Ballard
kdm communications limited
St Neots, UK

Tel. +44 (0) 1480 405333
Fax: +44 (0) 1480 477833

Copyright © iotaSciences

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

This open access paper was published on the 26th of October and is available to download at:

Related News Press

News and information

HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon November 18th, 2022

Researchers at Purdue unlock light-matter interactions on sub-nanometer scales, leading to ‘picophotonics’ November 18th, 2022

Rice turns asphaltene into graphene for composites: ‘Flashed’ byproduct of crude oil could bolster materials, polymer inks November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

Microfluidics/Nanofluidics

Researchers design new inks for 3D-printable wearable bioelectronics: Potential uses include printing electronic tattoos for medical tracking applications August 19th, 2022

Oregon State University research pushes closer to new therapy for pancreatic cancer May 6th, 2022

Directly into the brain: A 3D multifunctional and flexible neural interface: Novel design of brain chip implant allows for measuring neuronal activity while simultaneously delivering drugs to the implant site October 1st, 2021

Confined magnetic colloidal system for controllable fluid transport March 16th, 2021

Possible Futures

HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon November 18th, 2022

NIST’s grid of quantum islands could reveal secrets for powerful technologies November 18th, 2022

A new experiment pushes the boundaries of our understanding of topological quantum matter: The behavior of bosonic particles observed in a magnetic insulator fabricated from ruthenium chloride can be explained by a relatively new and little-studied physics phenomenon called the B November 18th, 2022

Trial by wind: Testing the heat resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites: Researchers use an arc-wind tunnel to test the heat resistance of carbon fiber reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites November 18th, 2022

Nanomedicine

Cutting-edge combination shows promise in patients with chemotherapy-resistant urothelial cancer November 4th, 2022

Advanced nanoparticles provide new weapon to fight difficult cancers: Researchers use nanoparticles to deliver a bacterially derived compound that targets the STING pathway to suppress tumor growth and metastasis by disrupting blood vessels and stimulating immune response October 28th, 2022

Smart materials: metal cations-recognizable thermoresponsive polymers: Osaka Metropolitan University scientists developed a novel polymer, the thermoresponsiveness of which can easily be regulated by changing the type and mixing ratio of ionic species October 14th, 2022

Quantum-Si’s next-generation single-molecule protein sequencing technology published in Science, signaling new era of life science and biomedical research: Semiconductor chip and Time Domain Sequencing™ technology will advance drug discovery and diagnostics, enabling people to li October 14th, 2022

Discoveries

An on-chip time-lens generates ultrafast pulses: New device opens the doors to applications in communication, quantum computing, astronomy November 18th, 2022

Researchers at Purdue unlock light-matter interactions on sub-nanometer scales, leading to ‘picophotonics’ November 18th, 2022

Rice turns asphaltene into graphene for composites: ‘Flashed’ byproduct of crude oil could bolster materials, polymer inks November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

Announcements

HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon November 18th, 2022

NIST’s grid of quantum islands could reveal secrets for powerful technologies November 18th, 2022

A new experiment pushes the boundaries of our understanding of topological quantum matter: The behavior of bosonic particles observed in a magnetic insulator fabricated from ruthenium chloride can be explained by a relatively new and little-studied physics phenomenon called the B November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

An on-chip time-lens generates ultrafast pulses: New device opens the doors to applications in communication, quantum computing, astronomy November 18th, 2022

Researchers at Purdue unlock light-matter interactions on sub-nanometer scales, leading to ‘picophotonics’ November 18th, 2022

Rice turns asphaltene into graphene for composites: ‘Flashed’ byproduct of crude oil could bolster materials, polymer inks November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

Nanobiotechnology

Cutting-edge combination shows promise in patients with chemotherapy-resistant urothelial cancer November 4th, 2022

Advanced nanoparticles provide new weapon to fight difficult cancers: Researchers use nanoparticles to deliver a bacterially derived compound that targets the STING pathway to suppress tumor growth and metastasis by disrupting blood vessels and stimulating immune response October 28th, 2022

Smart materials: metal cations-recognizable thermoresponsive polymers: Osaka Metropolitan University scientists developed a novel polymer, the thermoresponsiveness of which can easily be regulated by changing the type and mixing ratio of ionic species October 14th, 2022

Quantum-Si’s next-generation single-molecule protein sequencing technology published in Science, signaling new era of life science and biomedical research: Semiconductor chip and Time Domain Sequencing™ technology will advance drug discovery and diagnostics, enabling people to li October 14th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project