Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Is teleportation possible? Yes, in the quantum world: Quantum teleportation is an important step in improving quantum computing

A quantum processor semiconductor chip is connected to a circuit board in the lab of John Nichol, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester. Nichol and Andrew Jordan, a professor of physics, are exploring new ways of creating quantum-mechanical interactions between distant electrons, promising major advances in quantum computing.

CREDIT
University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster
A quantum processor semiconductor chip is connected to a circuit board in the lab of John Nichol, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester. Nichol and Andrew Jordan, a professor of physics, are exploring new ways of creating quantum-mechanical interactions between distant electrons, promising major advances in quantum computing. CREDIT University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster

Abstract:
"Beam me up" is one of the most famous catchphrases from the Star Trek series. It is the command issued when a character wishes to teleport from a remote location back to the Starship Enterprise.

Is teleportation possible? Yes, in the quantum world: Quantum teleportation is an important step in improving quantum computing

Rochester, NY | Posted on June 19th, 2020

While human teleportation exists only in science fiction, teleportation is possible in the subatomic world of quantum mechanics--albeit not in the way typically depicted on TV. In the quantum world, teleportation involves the transportation of information, rather than the transportation of matter.

Last year scientists confirmed that information could be passed between photons on computer chips even when the photons were not physically linked.

Now, according to new research from the University of Rochester and Purdue University, teleportation may also be possible between electrons.

In a paper published in Nature Communications and one to appear in Physical Review X, the researchers, including John Nichol, an assistant professor of physics at Rochester, and Andrew Jordan, a professor of physics at Rochester, explore new ways of creating quantum-mechanical interactions between distant electrons. The research is an important step in improving quantum computing, which, in turn, has the potential to revolutionize technology, medicine, and science by providing faster and more efficient processors and sensors.

'SPOOKY ACTION AT A DISTANCE'

Quantum teleportation is a demonstration of what Albert Einstein famously called "spooky action at a distance"--also known as quantum entanglement. In entanglement--one of the basic of concepts of quantum physics--the properties of one particle affect the properties of another, even when the particles are separated by a large distance. Quantum teleportation involves two distant, entangled particles in which the state of a third particle instantly "teleports" its state to the two entangled particles.

Quantum teleportation is an important means for transmitting information in quantum computing. While a typical computer consists of billions of transistors, called bits, quantum computers encode information in quantum bits, or qubits. A bit has a single binary value, which can be either "0" or "1," but qubits can be both "0" and "1" at the same time. The ability for individual qubits to simultaneously occupy multiple states underlies the great potential power of quantum computers.

Scientists have recently demonstrated quantum teleportation by using electromagnetic photons to create remotely entangled pairs of qubits.

Qubits made from individual electrons, however, are also promising for transmitting information in semiconductors.

"Individual electrons are promising qubits because they interact very easily with each other, and individual electron qubits in semiconductors are also scalable," Nichol says. "Reliably creating long-distance interactions between electrons is essential for quantum computing."

Creating entangled pairs of electron qubits that span long distances, which is required for teleportation, has proved challenging, though: while photons naturally propagate over long distances, electrons usually are confined to one place.

ENTANGLED PAIRS OF ELECTRONS

In order to demonstrate quantum teleportation using electrons, the researchers harnessed a recently developed technique based on the principles of Heisenberg exchange coupling. An individual electron is like a bar magnet with a north pole and a south pole that can point either up or down. The direction of the pole--whether the north pole is pointing up or down, for instance--is known as the electron's magnetic moment or quantum spin state. If certain kinds of particles have the same magnetic moment, they cannot be in the same place at the same time. That is, two electrons in the same quantum state cannot sit on top of each other. If they did, their states would swap back and forth in time.

The researchers used the technique to distribute entangled pairs of electrons and teleport their spin states.

"We provide evidence for 'entanglement swapping,' in which we create entanglement between two electrons even though the particles never interact, and 'quantum gate teleportation,' a potentially useful technique for quantum computing using teleportation," Nichol says. "Our work shows that this can be done even without photons."

The results pave the way for future research on quantum teleportation involving spin states of all matter, not just photons, and provide more evidence for the surprisingly useful capabilities of individual electrons in qubit semiconductors.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Lindsey Valich

603-493-1382

@UofR

Copyright © University of Rochester

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

The lightest shielding material in the world: Protection against electromagnetic interference July 3rd, 2020

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions July 3rd, 2020

Charcoal a weapon to fight superoxide-induced disease, injury: Nanomaterials soak up radicals, could aid treatment of COVID-19 July 2nd, 2020

The nature of nuclear forces imprinted in photons June 30th, 2020

Possible Futures

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution July 3rd, 2020

Chip Technology

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Extensive review of spin-gapless semiconductors: Next-generation spintronics candidates: spin-gapless semiconductors (SGSs) bridge the zero-gap materials and half-metals June 26th, 2020

Process for 'two-faced' nanomaterials may aid energy, information tech June 26th, 2020

Quantum Computing

Extensive review of spin-gapless semiconductors: Next-generation spintronics candidates: spin-gapless semiconductors (SGSs) bridge the zero-gap materials and half-metals June 26th, 2020

Measuring a tiny quasiparticle is a major step forward for semiconductor technology: Research team publishes latest findings on promising quasiparticles and their interactions June 19th, 2020

Excitons form superfluid in certain 2D combos: Rice University researchers find ‘paradox’ in ground-state bilayers June 15th, 2020

A stitch in time: How a quantum physicist invented new code from old tricks: Error suppression opens pathway to universal quantum computing May 22nd, 2020

Discoveries

The lightest shielding material in the world: Protection against electromagnetic interference July 3rd, 2020

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Announcements

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution July 3rd, 2020

Flexible material shows potential for use in fabrics to heat, cool July 3rd, 2020

Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions July 3rd, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution July 3rd, 2020

Flexible material shows potential for use in fabrics to heat, cool July 3rd, 2020

Military

A Tremendous Recognition’ Engineer Jonathan Klamkin earns prestigious award from DARPA June 23rd, 2020

Fluorocarbon bonds are no match for light-powered nanocatalyst: Rice U. lab unveils catalyst that can break problematic C-F bonds June 22nd, 2020

Teaching physics to neural networks removes 'chaos blindness' June 19th, 2020

Measuring a tiny quasiparticle is a major step forward for semiconductor technology: Research team publishes latest findings on promising quasiparticles and their interactions June 19th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project