Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Self-powered X-ray detector to revolutionize imaging for medicine, security and research: 2D perovskite thin films boost sensitivity 100-fold compared to conventional detectors, require no outside power source, and enable low-dose dental and medical images

X-ray detectors made with 2-dimensional perovskite thin films convert X-ray photons to electrical signals without requiring an outside power source, and are a hundred times more sensitive than conventional detectors.

CREDIT
Los Alamos National Laboratory
X-ray detectors made with 2-dimensional perovskite thin films convert X-ray photons to electrical signals without requiring an outside power source, and are a hundred times more sensitive than conventional detectors. CREDIT Los Alamos National Laboratory

Abstract:
A new X-ray detector prototype is on the brink of revolutionizing medical imaging, with dramatic reduction in radiation exposure and the associated health risks, while also boosting resolution in security scanners and research applications, thanks to a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory researchers.

Self-powered X-ray detector to revolutionize imaging for medicine, security and research: 2D perovskite thin films boost sensitivity 100-fold compared to conventional detectors, require no outside power source, and enable low-dose dental and medical images

Los Alamos, NM | Posted on April 12th, 2020

"The perovskite material at the heart of our detector prototype can be produced with low-cost fabrication techniques," said Hsinhan (Dave) Tsai, an Oppenheimer Postdoctoral fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory. "The result is a cost-effective, highly sensitive, and self-powered detector that could radically improve existing X-ray detectors, and potentially lead to a host of unforeseen applications."

The detector replaces silicon-based technology with a structure built around a thin film of the mineral perovskite, resulting in a hundred times more sensitivity than conventional silicon-based detectors. In addition, the new perovskite detector does not require an outside power source to produce electrical signals in response to X-rays.

High sensitivity perovskite detectors could enable dental and medical images that require a tiny fraction of the exposure that accompanies conventional X-ray imaging. Reduced exposure decreases risks for patients and medical staff alike. The fact that perovskite detectors can be made very thin allows them to offer increased resolution for highly detailed images, which will lead to improved medical evaluations and diagnoses. Lower-energy and increased-resolution detectors could also revolutionize security scanners and imaging in X-ray research applications.

Because perovskite is rich in heavy elements, such as lead and iodine, X-rays that easily pass through silicon undetected are more readily absorbed, and detected, in perovskite. As a result, perovskite significantly outperforms silicon, particularly at detecting high-energy X-rays. This is a crucial advantage when it comes to monitoring X-rays at high-energy research facilities, such as synchrotron light sources.

Perovskite films can be deposited on surfaces by spraying solutions that cure and leave thin layers of the material behind As a result, the thin-layer detectors will be much easier and cheaper to produce than silicon-based detectors, which require high-temperature metal deposition under vacuum conditions.

"Potentially, we could use ink-jet types of systems to print large scale detectors," said Tsai. "This would allow us to replace half-million-dollar silicon detector arrays with inexpensive, higher-resolution perovskite alternatives."

In addition to the promise of thin-layer perovskites in X-ray detectors, thicker layers work well provided they include a small voltage source. This suggests that their useful energy range could be extended beyond X-rays to low-energy gamma-rays.

###

The new prototype was fabricated and tested successfully thanks to a collaborative effort among Los Alamos National Laboratory material scientists led by Wanyi Nie and Hsinhan Tsai, and the Los Alamos Theory team led by Sergei Tretiak, in conjunction with Joseph Strzalka at Argonne National Laboratory's X-ray Science Division.

####

About Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security, is operated by Triad, a public service oriented, national security science organization equally owned by its three founding members: Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), the Texas A&M University System (TAMUS), and the Regents of the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

Los Alamos enhances national security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to energy, environment, infrastructure, health, and global security concerns.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
James Riordon

505-551-4004

@LosAlamosNatLab

Copyright © Los Alamos National Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

2 Dimensional Materials

Staying ahead of the curve with 3D curved graphene November 20th, 2020

Nano-microscope gives first direct observation of the magnetic properties of 2D materials: Discovery means new class of materials and technologies September 18th, 2020

Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide lens for high resolution imaging August 14th, 2020

Imaging

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles: Imaging technology offers advantages for diagnostics, other uses November 17th, 2020

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA: Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices November 10th, 2020

Higher-resolution imaging of living, moving cells using plasmonic metasurfaces: Metasurface of self-assembled gold nanoparticles shown to improve resolution of fluorescence images of living cells under a widefield optical microscope to the theoretical limit November 6th, 2020

Timekeeping theory combines quantum clocks and Einstein's relativity: Research reveals new time dilation phenomenon October 23rd, 2020

Laboratories

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer November 17th, 2020

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA: Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices November 10th, 2020

Breakthrough quantum-dot transistors create a flexible alternative to conventional electronics: Quantum dot logic circuits provide the long-sought building blocks for innovative devices, including printable electronics, flexible displays, and medical diagnostics October 30th, 2020

New NIST project to build nano-thermometers could revolutionize temperature imaging: Cheaper refrigerators? Stronger hip implants? A better understanding of human disease? All of these could be possible October 9th, 2020

Machine learning takes on synthetic biology: algorithms can bioengineer cells for you: Berkeley Lab scientists develop a tool that could drastically speed up the ability to design new biological systems September 25th, 2020

Perovskites

Lead-free magnetic perovskites November 6th, 2020

Aberrant electronic and structural alterations in pressure tuned perovskite NaOsO3 September 18th, 2020

Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution July 3rd, 2020

Law enforcement/Anti-Counterfeiting/Security/Loss prevention

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announces Industry-Leading GF SHIELD Program to Further Safeguard Customer Data and IP: GF embraces experience of manufacturing the world’s most secure semiconductor solutions for the defense and aerospace industry, and extends these world-class security capabilit October 1st, 2020

Thin films

FEFU scientists are paving way for future tiny electronics and gadgets August 28th, 2020

Extremely low thermal conductivity in 1D soft chain structure BiSeX (X = Br, I) June 19th, 2020

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer November 17th, 2020

Arrowhead Interim Clinical Data Demonstrate ARO-AAT Treatment Improved Multiple Biomarkers of Alpha-1 Liver Disease November 13th, 2020

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA: Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices November 10th, 2020

Face mask aims to deactivate virus to protect others: Antiviral layer attacks respiratory droplets to make mask wearer less infectious October 30th, 2020

Possible Futures

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

Nanomedicine

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles: Tunable coating allows hitch-hiking nanoparticles to slip past the immune system to their target November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Announces Closing of Agreement with Takeda November 27th, 2020

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Fiscal 2020 Year End Results November 23rd, 2020

Discoveries

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles: Tunable coating allows hitch-hiking nanoparticles to slip past the immune system to their target November 27th, 2020

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

Announcements

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

Tools

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles: Imaging technology offers advantages for diagnostics, other uses November 17th, 2020

Higher-resolution imaging of living, moving cells using plasmonic metasurfaces: Metasurface of self-assembled gold nanoparticles shown to improve resolution of fluorescence images of living cells under a widefield optical microscope to the theoretical limit November 6th, 2020

Timekeeping theory combines quantum clocks and Einstein's relativity: Research reveals new time dilation phenomenon October 23rd, 2020

Bruker Launches Advanced In-Situ Nanomechanical Test Instrument for Analyzing Materials Deformation in Electron Microscopes: Hysitron PI 89 SEM PicoIndenter Offers Unprecedented Range and Flexibility October 15th, 2020

Research partnerships

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

Industrial-strength brine, meet your kryptonite: Boron nitride coating is key ingredient in hypersaline desalination technology November 6th, 2020

Rice finds path to nanodiamond from graphene: A spot of pressure enables chemical conversion to hardened 2D material October 29th, 2020

Cicada-inspired waterproof surfaces closer to reality, researchers report October 23rd, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project