Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > An 'exceptionally stable' single-atom catalyst: Single platinum atoms stabilized in C12A7 crystals

Figure 1. Single platinum atoms stabilized in C12A7 crystals Interaction between negatively charged ions and positively charged surface cavities of C12A7 for effective stabilization of single platinum atoms.
Figure 1. Single platinum atoms stabilized in C12A7 crystals Interaction between negatively charged ions and positively charged surface cavities of C12A7 for effective stabilization of single platinum atoms.

Abstract:
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have shown that single platinum atoms trapped in C12A7 crystals act as a stable and effective catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes, an essential process in the production of many kinds of fine chemicals. Their approach could become a versatile route for developing other single-atom catalysts for wide-ranging industrial applications.

An 'exceptionally stable' single-atom catalyst: Single platinum atoms stabilized in C12A7 crystals

Tokyo, Japan | Posted on February 26th, 2020

Single-atom catalysts (SACs) are on the way to becoming dream catalysts ― ones that exhibit superb performance based on optimized usage of metal atoms. Many research teams around the world have been working to advance the scalable development of SACs since they were first proposed by Tao Zhang and colleagues in China and the US in 2011.

Now, in a proof-of-concept study that throws the door wide open to developing a new range of SACs, researchers at Tokyo Tech have designed and tested a catalyst composed of single platinum atoms trapped in C12A7, a nanoporous crystal widely used in the production of aluminous cement.

The inner structure of C12A7 crystals is "just the right size" for trapping single metal atoms, the researchers say in their paper published in Nature Communications.

"Our approach is rather like a 'diamond-in-a-ring' strategy, where the surface cavity of C12A7 can be regarded as a ring, and the single platinum atom is fixed on the ring as a diamond," says first author Tian-Nan Ye at Tokyo Tech's Materials Research Center for Element Strategy.

Ye explains that C12A7 has a positively charged framework structure composed of twelve sub-nanometer-sized cages, each with an inner diameter of around 0.4 nanometers ― a suitable size for capturing individual metal atoms. Each cage has a positive charge of +1/3, and the surface cavities have an open 'mouth' that can trap single metal atoms through electronic interaction.

The catalyst has been demonstrated to be highly stable and active toward the selective hydrogenation of nitroarenes, an important process often used in the dye and polymer industries. It has a higher turnover frequency (up to 25772 per hour) than that of platinum-based catalysts unsupported by C12A7. Remarkably, the new catalyst even works at temperatures of up to 600C.

Based on these promising results, the researchers investigated whether the trapping effect might work using other metals. As they predicted, C12A7 was also capable of capturing single atoms of ruthenium and rhodium, indicating that their strategy would be applicable to various transition metals.

"Our findings open countless doors to developing new kinds of SACs for different catalytic processes," says Ye. Due to its exceptionally high thermal stability, the C12A7 support would be able to withstand harsher conditions involved in other industrially important processes such as ammonia synthesis and CO2 reduction.

Ye points out that the development of SACs cannot be separated from the exploration of new materials. This is a key reason why Professor Hideo Hosono's group at Tokyo Tech is uniquely positioned to be a pioneer in SAC research, he says, building on a series of achievements including the development of novel semiconductors, an iron-based superconductor, and the first room-temperature-stable electride.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Tokyo Institute of Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Reference

Related News Press

News and information

An EPiQS Pursuit: Physicist Andrea Young is chosen to receive an Experimental Investigator award from the Moore Foundation May 28th, 2020

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball: Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials May 26th, 2020

Surrey reveals its implantable biosensor that operates without batteries May 22nd, 2020

Researchers demonstrate transport of mechanical energy, even through damaged pathways: Topological pump can provide stability for communication technologies May 22nd, 2020

Oriented hexagonal boron nitride foster new type of information carrier May 22nd, 2020

Physics

An EPiQS Pursuit: Physicist Andrea Young is chosen to receive an Experimental Investigator award from the Moore Foundation May 28th, 2020

MSU scientists solve half-century-old magnesium dimer mystery May 22nd, 2020

Chemistry

MSU scientists solve half-century-old magnesium dimer mystery May 22nd, 2020

Possible Futures

An EPiQS Pursuit: Physicist Andrea Young is chosen to receive an Experimental Investigator award from the Moore Foundation May 28th, 2020

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball: Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials May 26th, 2020

Visualization of functional components to characterize optimal composite electrodes May 22nd, 2020

Researchers demonstrate transport of mechanical energy, even through damaged pathways: Topological pump can provide stability for communication technologies May 22nd, 2020

Discoveries

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball: Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials May 26th, 2020

MSU scientists solve half-century-old magnesium dimer mystery May 22nd, 2020

Researchers review advances in 3D printing of high-entropy alloys: SUTD collaborates with universities in Singapore and China to shine light on HEA manufacturing processes and inspire further research in this emerging field May 22nd, 2020

A stitch in time: How a quantum physicist invented new code from old tricks: Error suppression opens pathway to universal quantum computing May 22nd, 2020

Materials/Metamaterials

An EPiQS Pursuit: Physicist Andrea Young is chosen to receive an Experimental Investigator award from the Moore Foundation May 28th, 2020

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball: Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials May 26th, 2020

Researchers review advances in 3D printing of high-entropy alloys: SUTD collaborates with universities in Singapore and China to shine light on HEA manufacturing processes and inspire further research in this emerging field May 22nd, 2020

Researchers demonstrate transport of mechanical energy, even through damaged pathways: Topological pump can provide stability for communication technologies May 22nd, 2020

Announcements

An EPiQS Pursuit: Physicist Andrea Young is chosen to receive an Experimental Investigator award from the Moore Foundation May 28th, 2020

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball: Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials May 26th, 2020

Visualization of functional components to characterize optimal composite electrodes May 22nd, 2020

Researchers demonstrate transport of mechanical energy, even through damaged pathways: Topological pump can provide stability for communication technologies May 22nd, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball: Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials May 26th, 2020

Surrey reveals its implantable biosensor that operates without batteries May 22nd, 2020

Visualization of functional components to characterize optimal composite electrodes May 22nd, 2020

Researchers demonstrate transport of mechanical energy, even through damaged pathways: Topological pump can provide stability for communication technologies May 22nd, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project