Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Scientists invented how to improve steel properties by 100 times: A breakthrough method of ion implantation makes stainless steel more wear resistant by 100 times

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University developed a new method of ion implantation that dramatically expands the application of the alloying process in the industry. This is a highly intensive implantation of ions with low energy that can revolutionize the technology of improving material properties. TPU scientists have already experimentally confirmed the possibility of creating a doped surface layer with a depth of several hundred micrometers, while other methods of ion doping enable a depth of several tens and hundreds of nanometers.

CREDIT
Tomsk Polytechnic University
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University developed a new method of ion implantation that dramatically expands the application of the alloying process in the industry. This is a highly intensive implantation of ions with low energy that can revolutionize the technology of improving material properties. TPU scientists have already experimentally confirmed the possibility of creating a doped surface layer with a depth of several hundred micrometers, while other methods of ion doping enable a depth of several tens and hundreds of nanometers. CREDIT Tomsk Polytechnic University

Abstract:
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have updated the alloying process, i.e. improving the properties of metal with impurities, which not only enhances the wear resistance of materials but also provides new qualities required by hi-tech manufacturing, science, and energy.

Scientists invented how to improve steel properties by 100 times: A breakthrough method of ion implantation makes stainless steel more wear resistant by 100 times

Tomsk, Russia | Posted on September 6th, 2019

The study results were published in the journal Surface and Coatings Technology and presented at the conference on Surface Modification of Materials by Ion Beams (SMMIB) 2019 that recently took place in Tomsk.

By now, traditional alloying methods are reported to have exhausted their technological potential. Therefore, metals are more increasingly exposed to beams of charged particles, plasma flows, and laser radiation so as to obtain advanced materials. Ion implantation (ion doping) is one of those methods enabling to change elemental composition, microstructure, and morphology of surface layers that determine such properties as wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and others.

Tomsk scientists developed a new method of ion implantation that dramatically expands the applications of the method in industry. According to Alexander Ryabchikov, the head of the Laboratory for Highly Intensive Ion Implantation, they have been able to experimentally improve the wear resistance of stainless steel by more than a hundred times.

In addition, this technology makes it possible to manufacture details and products with needed specific surface properties. For example, a barrier layer is formed by ion doping of zirconium with titanium, thus preventing oxygen penetration. This can be used to increase the service life and safety of operation of nuclear fuel cells.

Currently, the industrial use of ion doping is constrained by the small thickness of the formed ion-doped layers. The issue to be addressed through the increased kinetic energy of the ion flux implies the use of big accelerators, which is not cost-effective.

'We proposed to increase the ion penetration depth into the material by enhancing the radiation-induced diffusion with high-density ion beams that are two-three orders of magnitude superior to those used in traditional ion implantation,' said Alexander Ryabchikov.

The results obtained in the laboratory confirm the possibility of creating a doped surface layer with a depth of several hundred micrometers, while other methods of ion doping enable a depth of several tens and hundreds of nanometers.

The authors emphasize that the development of highly intensive implantation of ions with low energy could revolutionize the technology of improving material properties. Further research in this field will enable to reduce the cost of the technology application and improve the quality of products.

###

The study was supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation.

This year, Russia hosted the 21st International Conference on Surface Modification of Materials by Ion Beams (SMMIB-2019) for the first time. It was held on 26 - 30 August 2019 in Tomsk. Tomsk Polytechnic University was a co-organizer and the venue of the event. The large-scale conference brought together over 150 scientists (from 22 countries) who are leading physicists in the field of ion beam technology and advanced materials.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Kristina Nabokova

7-382-270-5685

Copyright © Tomsk Polytechnic University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Biology’s hardest working pigments and ‘MOFs’ might just save the climate: A range of processes that currently depend on fossil fuels but are really hard to electrify will depend on the development of genuinely clean fuels, and for that to happen, much more efficient catalysts wi July 22nd, 2022

Generating power where seawater and river water meet July 22nd, 2022

First electric nanomotor made from DNA material: Synthetic rotary motors at the nanoscale perform mechanical work July 22nd, 2022

At the water’s edge: Self-assembling 2D materials at a liquid–liquid interface: Scientists find a simple way to produce heterolayer coordination nanosheets, expanding the diversity of 2D materials July 22nd, 2022

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

UNC Charlotte-led team invents new anticoagulant platform, offering hope for advances for heart surgery, dialysis, other procedures July 15th, 2022

Strain-sensing smart skin ready to deploy: Nanotube-embedded coating detects threats from wear and tear in large structures July 15th, 2022

Rensselaer researchers learn to control electron spin at room temperature to make devices more efficient and faster: Electron spin, rather than charge, holds the key July 15th, 2022

Crystal phase engineering offers glimpse of future potential, researchers say July 15th, 2022

Possible Futures

Biology’s hardest working pigments and ‘MOFs’ might just save the climate: A range of processes that currently depend on fossil fuels but are really hard to electrify will depend on the development of genuinely clean fuels, and for that to happen, much more efficient catalysts wi July 22nd, 2022

Generating power where seawater and river water meet July 22nd, 2022

First electric nanomotor made from DNA material: Synthetic rotary motors at the nanoscale perform mechanical work July 22nd, 2022

At the water’s edge: Self-assembling 2D materials at a liquid–liquid interface: Scientists find a simple way to produce heterolayer coordination nanosheets, expanding the diversity of 2D materials July 22nd, 2022

Discoveries

HKU physicists found signatures of highly entangled quantum matter July 22nd, 2022

How different cancer cells respond to drug-delivering nanoparticles: The findings of a large-scale screen could help researchers design nanoparticles that target specific types of cancer July 22nd, 2022

The best semiconductor of them all? Researchers have found a material that can perform much better than silicon. The next step is finding practical and economic ways to make it July 22nd, 2022

Buckyballs on gold are less exotic than graphene July 22nd, 2022

Materials/Metamaterials

At the water’s edge: Self-assembling 2D materials at a liquid–liquid interface: Scientists find a simple way to produce heterolayer coordination nanosheets, expanding the diversity of 2D materials July 22nd, 2022

Strain-sensing smart skin ready to deploy: Nanotube-embedded coating detects threats from wear and tear in large structures July 15th, 2022

New protocol for assessing the safety of nanomaterials July 1st, 2022

Nanotubes: a promising solution for advanced rubber cables with 60% less conductive filler June 1st, 2022

Announcements

Quantum computer works with more than zero and one: Quantum digits unlock more computational power with fewer quantum particles July 22nd, 2022

Biology’s hardest working pigments and ‘MOFs’ might just save the climate: A range of processes that currently depend on fossil fuels but are really hard to electrify will depend on the development of genuinely clean fuels, and for that to happen, much more efficient catalysts wi July 22nd, 2022

Generating power where seawater and river water meet July 22nd, 2022

First electric nanomotor made from DNA material: Synthetic rotary motors at the nanoscale perform mechanical work July 22nd, 2022

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Buckyballs on gold are less exotic than graphene July 22nd, 2022

Quantum computer works with more than zero and one: Quantum digits unlock more computational power with fewer quantum particles July 22nd, 2022

Biology’s hardest working pigments and ‘MOFs’ might just save the climate: A range of processes that currently depend on fossil fuels but are really hard to electrify will depend on the development of genuinely clean fuels, and for that to happen, much more efficient catalysts wi July 22nd, 2022

Generating power where seawater and river water meet July 22nd, 2022

Events/Classes

CEA & Partners Present ‘Powerful Step Towards Industrialization’ Of Linear Si Quantum Dot Arrays Using FDSOI Material at VLSI Symposium: Invited paper reports 3-step characterization chain and resulting methodologies and metrics that accelerate learning, provide data on device pe June 17th, 2022

June Conference in Grenoble, France, to Explore Pathways to 6G Applications, Including ‘Internet of Senses’, Sustainability, Extended Reality & Digital Twin of Physical World: Organized by CEA-Leti, the Joint EuCNC and 6G Summit Sees Telecom Sector as an ‘Enabler for a Sustainabl June 1st, 2022

How a physicist aims to reduce the noise in quantum computing: NAU assistant professor Ryan Behunin received an NSF CAREER grant to study how to reduce the noise produced in the process of quantum computing, which will make it better and more practical April 1st, 2022

Could quantum technology be New Mexico’s next economic boon? Quantum New Mexico Coalition aims to establish state as national hub April 1st, 2022

Construction

Strain-sensing smart skin ready to deploy: Nanotube-embedded coating detects threats from wear and tear in large structures July 15th, 2022

A sunlight-driven “self-healing” anti-corrosion coating May 27th, 2022

Polymer fibers with graphene nanotubes make it possible to heat hard-to-reach, complex-shaped items February 11th, 2022

You're so vein: Scientists discover faster way to manufacture vascular materials May 14th, 2021

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project