Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Breakthrough enables storage and release of mechanical waves without energy loss: The development may have broad implications for efficient harvesting, storing, and control of energy flow for mechanical and optical applications

Experimental setup, consisting of a waveguide bar with cavity and side channels. The excitation of elastic waves traveling along the bar is provided by piezoelectric actuators placed at the two ends of the system. Credit: Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech

CREDIT
Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech
Experimental setup, consisting of a waveguide bar with cavity and side channels. The excitation of elastic waves traveling along the bar is provided by piezoelectric actuators placed at the two ends of the system. Credit: Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech CREDIT Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech

Abstract:
•Their proof-of-concept experiment may have broad implications for efficient harvesting, storing, and control of energy flow for mechanical and optical applications
The findings may facilitate improved technology for monitoring the structural integrity of bridges and other structural components
•The discovery may also lead to improved methods for energy harvesting and storage, wireless charging of electric vehicles, and may also have applications in quantum computing and ultralow-energy photonics

Breakthrough enables storage and release of mechanical waves without energy loss: The development may have broad implications for efficient harvesting, storing, and control of energy flow for mechanical and optical applications

New York, NY | Posted on August 30th, 2019

Light and sound waves are at the basis of energy and signal transport and fundamental to some of our most basic technologies -- from cell phones to engines. Scientists, however, have yet to devise a method that allows them to store a wave intact for an indefinite period of time and then direct it toward a desired location on demand. Such a development would greatly facilitate the ability to manipulate waves for a variety of desired uses, including energy harvesting, quantum computing, structural-integrity monitoring, information storage, and more.

In a newly published paper in Science Advances, a group of researchers led by Andrea Alů, founding director of the Photonics Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and by Massimo Ruzzene, professor of Aeronautics Engineering at Georgia Tech, have experimentally shown that it is possible to efficiently capture and store a wave intact then guide it towards a specific location.

"Our experiment proves that unconventional forms of excitation open new opportunities to gain control over wave propagation and scattering," said Alů. "By carefully tailoring the time dependence of the excitation, it is possible to trick the wave to be efficiently stored in a cavity, and then release it on demand towards the desired direction."

Methodology

To achieve their goal, the scientists had to devise a way for changing the basic interaction between waves and materials. When a light or sound wave hits an obstacle, it is either partially absorbed or reflected and scattered. The absorption process entails immediately converting of the wave into heat or other forms of energy. Materials that can't absorb waves only reflect and scatter them. The researchers' goal was to find a way to mimic the absorbtion process without converting the wave into other forms of energy and instead storing it in the material. This concept, introduced theoretically two years ago by the ASRC group, is known as coherent virtual absorption.

To prove their theory, the researchers reasoned that they needed to tailor the waves' time evolution so that when they came in contact with non-abosorbing materials, they wouldn't be reflected, scattered, or transmitted. This would prevent the wave impinging on the structure from escaping, and it would be efficiently trapped inside as if it were being absorbed. The stored wave could then be released on demand.

During their experiment, researchers propagated two mechanical waves traveling in opposite directions along a carbon steel waveguide bar that contained a cavity. The time variations of each wave were carefully controlled to ensure that the cavity would retain all of the impinging energy. Then, by stopping the excitation or detuning one of the waves, they were able to control the release of the stored energy and send it towards a desired direction on demand.

"While we ran our proof-of-concept experiment using elastic waves traveling in a solid material, our findings are also applicable to radiowaves and light, offering exciting prospects for efficient energy harvesting, wireless power transfer, low-energy photonics, and generally enhanced control over wave propagation," said Ruzzene.

###

Research Funding

This study was funded by the the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Simons Foundation.

####

About Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY
The Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center, CUNY is a world-leading center of scientific excellence, which elevates scientific research and education at CUNY and beyond through initiatives in five distinctive, but broadly interconnected disciplines: nanoscience, photonics, neuroscience, structural biology, and environmental sciences. The ASRC promotes a collaborative, interdisciplinary research culture where renowned scientists advance their discoveries using state-of-the-art equipment and cutting-edge core facilities.

About The Graduate Center of The City University of New York

The Graduate Center, CUNY is a leader in public graduate education devoted to enhancing the public good through pioneering research, serious learning, and reasoned debate. The Graduate Center offers ambitious students more than 40 doctoral and master's programs of the highest caliber, taught by top faculty from throughout CUNY -- the nation's largest public urban university. Through its nearly 40 centers, institutes, initiatives, and the Advanced Science Research Center, The Graduate Center influences public policy and discourse and shapes innovation. The Graduate Center's extensive public programs make it a home for culture and conversation.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Shawn Rhea

212-817-7180

Copyright © Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Arrowhead and Collaborator Janssen Present Phase 2 Clinical Data for Investigational Hepatitis B Regimens at The Liver Meeting® 2019 November 8th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Argonne collaborates to review current battery recycling processes for electric vehicles November 8th, 2019

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Possible Futures

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Quantum Computing

A distinct spin on atomic transport: Work that demonstrates simultaneous control over transport and spin properties of cold atoms establishes a framework for exploring concepts of spintronics and solid-state physics November 8th, 2019

Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover a new high-temperature superconductor November 8th, 2019

Scientists tame Josephson vortices November 1st, 2019

Small magnets reveal big secrets: Work by international research team could have wide-ranging impact on information technology applications October 28th, 2019

Optical computing/Photonic computing

Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues: Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers September 23rd, 2019

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Save time using maths: Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae August 23rd, 2019

RIT to upgrade Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory through $1 million state grant: Upgrades to clean room will enhance university’s research capabilities in photonics, quantum technologies and smart systems August 16th, 2019

Discoveries

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover a new high-temperature superconductor November 8th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Announcements

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

A distinct spin on atomic transport: Work that demonstrates simultaneous control over transport and spin properties of cold atoms establishes a framework for exploring concepts of spintronics and solid-state physics November 8th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Arrowhead and Collaborator Janssen Present Phase 2 Clinical Data for Investigational Hepatitis B Regimens at The Liver Meeting® 2019 November 8th, 2019

Military

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Visible light and nanoparticle catalysts produce desirable bioactive molecules: Simple photochemical method takes advantage of quantum mechanics October 31st, 2019

Small magnets reveal big secrets: Work by international research team could have wide-ranging impact on information technology applications October 28th, 2019

Bio-inspired nano-catalyst guides chiral reactions October 25th, 2019

Energy

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Cage molecules act as molecular sieves for hydrogen isotope separation November 1st, 2019

New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells November 1st, 2019

Promising discovery could lead to a better, cheaper solar cell: Scientific instrument made at McGill reveals liquid-like properties of a solid substance November 1st, 2019

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

Argonne collaborates to review current battery recycling processes for electric vehicles November 8th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Shedding new light on the charging of lithium-ion batteries November 1st, 2019

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Nanoparticle orientation offers a way to enhance drug delivery: Coating particles with 'right-handed' molecules could help them penetrate cancer cells more easily November 5th, 2019

New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells November 1st, 2019

Promising discovery could lead to a better, cheaper solar cell: Scientific instrument made at McGill reveals liquid-like properties of a solid substance November 1st, 2019

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Researchers synthesize 'impossible' superconductor October 3rd, 2019

Trapping and moving tiny particles using light September 24th, 2019

Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues: Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers September 23rd, 2019

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Research partnerships

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Nanoparticle orientation offers a way to enhance drug delivery: Coating particles with 'right-handed' molecules could help them penetrate cancer cells more easily November 5th, 2019

Cage molecules act as molecular sieves for hydrogen isotope separation November 1st, 2019

New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells November 1st, 2019

Construction

Do you Kyoto? World-leading companies share their approaches to environmentally friendly business at NAUM’19 October 14th, 2019

The future of materials with graphene nanotubes starts in Japan September 19th, 2019

Scientists invented how to improve steel properties by 100 times: A breakthrough method of ion implantation makes stainless steel more wear resistant by 100 times September 6th, 2019

Laser-based ultrasound approach provides new direction for nondestructive testing: Patches coated with nanoparticles from candle soot found to generate ultrasonic waves that can be used to monitor the structural integrity of buildings September 4th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project