Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Breakthrough enables storage and release of mechanical waves without energy loss: The development may have broad implications for efficient harvesting, storing, and control of energy flow for mechanical and optical applications

Experimental setup, consisting of a waveguide bar with cavity and side channels. The excitation of elastic waves traveling along the bar is provided by piezoelectric actuators placed at the two ends of the system. Credit: Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech

CREDIT
Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech
Experimental setup, consisting of a waveguide bar with cavity and side channels. The excitation of elastic waves traveling along the bar is provided by piezoelectric actuators placed at the two ends of the system. Credit: Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech CREDIT Giuseppe Trainiti, Georgia Tech

Abstract:
•Their proof-of-concept experiment may have broad implications for efficient harvesting, storing, and control of energy flow for mechanical and optical applications
The findings may facilitate improved technology for monitoring the structural integrity of bridges and other structural components
•The discovery may also lead to improved methods for energy harvesting and storage, wireless charging of electric vehicles, and may also have applications in quantum computing and ultralow-energy photonics

Breakthrough enables storage and release of mechanical waves without energy loss: The development may have broad implications for efficient harvesting, storing, and control of energy flow for mechanical and optical applications

New York, NY | Posted on August 30th, 2019

Light and sound waves are at the basis of energy and signal transport and fundamental to some of our most basic technologies -- from cell phones to engines. Scientists, however, have yet to devise a method that allows them to store a wave intact for an indefinite period of time and then direct it toward a desired location on demand. Such a development would greatly facilitate the ability to manipulate waves for a variety of desired uses, including energy harvesting, quantum computing, structural-integrity monitoring, information storage, and more.

In a newly published paper in Science Advances, a group of researchers led by Andrea Alů, founding director of the Photonics Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and by Massimo Ruzzene, professor of Aeronautics Engineering at Georgia Tech, have experimentally shown that it is possible to efficiently capture and store a wave intact then guide it towards a specific location.

"Our experiment proves that unconventional forms of excitation open new opportunities to gain control over wave propagation and scattering," said Alů. "By carefully tailoring the time dependence of the excitation, it is possible to trick the wave to be efficiently stored in a cavity, and then release it on demand towards the desired direction."

Methodology

To achieve their goal, the scientists had to devise a way for changing the basic interaction between waves and materials. When a light or sound wave hits an obstacle, it is either partially absorbed or reflected and scattered. The absorption process entails immediately converting of the wave into heat or other forms of energy. Materials that can't absorb waves only reflect and scatter them. The researchers' goal was to find a way to mimic the absorbtion process without converting the wave into other forms of energy and instead storing it in the material. This concept, introduced theoretically two years ago by the ASRC group, is known as coherent virtual absorption.

To prove their theory, the researchers reasoned that they needed to tailor the waves' time evolution so that when they came in contact with non-abosorbing materials, they wouldn't be reflected, scattered, or transmitted. This would prevent the wave impinging on the structure from escaping, and it would be efficiently trapped inside as if it were being absorbed. The stored wave could then be released on demand.

During their experiment, researchers propagated two mechanical waves traveling in opposite directions along a carbon steel waveguide bar that contained a cavity. The time variations of each wave were carefully controlled to ensure that the cavity would retain all of the impinging energy. Then, by stopping the excitation or detuning one of the waves, they were able to control the release of the stored energy and send it towards a desired direction on demand.

"While we ran our proof-of-concept experiment using elastic waves traveling in a solid material, our findings are also applicable to radiowaves and light, offering exciting prospects for efficient energy harvesting, wireless power transfer, low-energy photonics, and generally enhanced control over wave propagation," said Ruzzene.

###

Research Funding

This study was funded by the the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Simons Foundation.

####

About Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY
The Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center, CUNY is a world-leading center of scientific excellence, which elevates scientific research and education at CUNY and beyond through initiatives in five distinctive, but broadly interconnected disciplines: nanoscience, photonics, neuroscience, structural biology, and environmental sciences. The ASRC promotes a collaborative, interdisciplinary research culture where renowned scientists advance their discoveries using state-of-the-art equipment and cutting-edge core facilities.

About The Graduate Center of The City University of New York

The Graduate Center, CUNY is a leader in public graduate education devoted to enhancing the public good through pioneering research, serious learning, and reasoned debate. The Graduate Center offers ambitious students more than 40 doctoral and master's programs of the highest caliber, taught by top faculty from throughout CUNY -- the nation's largest public urban university. Through its nearly 40 centers, institutes, initiatives, and the Advanced Science Research Center, The Graduate Center influences public policy and discourse and shapes innovation. The Graduate Center's extensive public programs make it a home for culture and conversation.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Shawn Rhea

212-817-7180

Copyright © Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

The future of materials with graphene nanotubes starts in Japan September 19th, 2019

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo September 18th, 2019

Keystone Nano Announces FDA Approval of Investigational New Drug Application for Ceraxa for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia September 18th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo September 18th, 2019

Keystone Nano Announces FDA Approval of Investigational New Drug Application for Ceraxa for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia September 18th, 2019

A Quantum Leap: $25M grant makes UC Santa Barbara home to the nation’s first NSF-funded Quantum Foundry, a center for development of materials for quantum information-based technologies September 16th, 2019

Possible Futures

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

The future of materials with graphene nanotubes starts in Japan September 19th, 2019

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo September 18th, 2019

Keystone Nano Announces FDA Approval of Investigational New Drug Application for Ceraxa for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia September 18th, 2019

Quantum Computing

Uncovering the hidden “noise” that can kill qubits: New detection tool could be used to make quantum computers robust against unwanted environmental disturbances September 17th, 2019

A Quantum Leap: $25M grant makes UC Santa Barbara home to the nation’s first NSF-funded Quantum Foundry, a center for development of materials for quantum information-based technologies September 16th, 2019

Scientists couple magnetization to superconductivity for quantum discoveries September 6th, 2019

Save time using maths: Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae August 23rd, 2019

Optical computing/Photonic computing

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Save time using maths: Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae August 23rd, 2019

RIT to upgrade Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory through $1 million state grant: Upgrades to clean room will enhance university’s research capabilities in photonics, quantum technologies and smart systems August 16th, 2019

RIT awarded NSF funding to conceptualize Quantum Photonic Institute: RIT will develop plan for open-access Quantum Foundry for quantum photonic circuits August 7th, 2019

Discoveries

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo September 18th, 2019

Uncovering the hidden “noise” that can kill qubits: New detection tool could be used to make quantum computers robust against unwanted environmental disturbances September 17th, 2019

Scientists create a nanomaterial that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time: The material developed at University of Bath allows for incredibly sensitive detection of the direction molecules twist September 13th, 2019

Announcements

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

The future of materials with graphene nanotubes starts in Japan September 19th, 2019

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo September 18th, 2019

Keystone Nano Announces FDA Approval of Investigational New Drug Application for Ceraxa for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia September 18th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo September 18th, 2019

Uncovering the hidden “noise” that can kill qubits: New detection tool could be used to make quantum computers robust against unwanted environmental disturbances September 17th, 2019

Journal Nanotechnology Progress International (JONPI), volume 7, issue 1 out September 16th, 2019

Military

A chameleon-inspired smart skin changes color in the sun September 11th, 2019

Hard as a diamond? Scientists predict new forms of superhard carbon: A study identifies dozens of new carbon structures that are expected to be superhard, including some that may be about as hard as diamonds September 9th, 2019

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs: Sacrificial ink-writing technique allows 3D printing of large, vascularized human organ building blocks September 6th, 2019

Nanoparticles could someday give humans built-in night vision August 28th, 2019

Energy

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Inspired by natural signals in living cells, researchers design artificial gas detector: Tiny box puts itself together and glows September 13th, 2019

Future of portable electronics -- Novel organic semiconductor with exciting properties: Researchers synthesize a new substance that can potentially be adapted to form a semiconductor with wide applications in electronics September 13th, 2019

Rice reactor turns greenhouse gas into pure liquid fuel: Lab's 'green' invention reduces carbon dioxide into valuable fuels September 3rd, 2019

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

The future of materials with graphene nanotubes starts in Japan September 19th, 2019

Nanoparticles in lithium-sulphur batteries detected with neutron experiment September 6th, 2019

ULVAC Launches Revolutionary PZT Piezoelectric Thin-film Process Technology and HVM Solution for MEMS Sensors/Actuators: Enabling Reliable, High-quality Film Production for Next Generation Devices August 16th, 2019

Tiny vibration-powered robots are the size of the world's smallest ant July 19th, 2019

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

One-atom switch supercharges fluorescent dyes: Rice University lab discovers simple technique to make biocompatible 'turn-on' dyes September 13th, 2019

Gem-like nanoparticles of precious metals shine as catalysts: Heated particles shift shape and become highly active catalytically September 12th, 2019

Hard as a diamond? Scientists predict new forms of superhard carbon: A study identifies dozens of new carbon structures that are expected to be superhard, including some that may be about as hard as diamonds September 9th, 2019

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs: Sacrificial ink-writing technique allows 3D printing of large, vascularized human organ building blocks September 6th, 2019

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Scientists create a nanomaterial that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time: The material developed at University of Bath allows for incredibly sensitive detection of the direction molecules twist September 13th, 2019

Optical vacuum cleaner can manipulate nanoparticles: The TPU and international researchers developed a concept for constructing an optical vacuum cleaner; due to its optical properties, it can trap nanoparticles from the environment; currently, there are no sufficiently effective September 13th, 2019

Laser-based ultrasound approach provides new direction for nondestructive testing: Patches coated with nanoparticles from candle soot found to generate ultrasonic waves that can be used to monitor the structural integrity of buildings September 4th, 2019

Research partnerships

Uncovering the hidden “noise” that can kill qubits: New detection tool could be used to make quantum computers robust against unwanted environmental disturbances September 17th, 2019

One-atom switch supercharges fluorescent dyes: Rice University lab discovers simple technique to make biocompatible 'turn-on' dyes September 13th, 2019

Hard as a diamond? Scientists predict new forms of superhard carbon: A study identifies dozens of new carbon structures that are expected to be superhard, including some that may be about as hard as diamonds September 9th, 2019

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs: Sacrificial ink-writing technique allows 3D printing of large, vascularized human organ building blocks September 6th, 2019

Construction

The future of materials with graphene nanotubes starts in Japan September 19th, 2019

Scientists invented how to improve steel properties by 100 times: A breakthrough method of ion implantation makes stainless steel more wear resistant by 100 times September 6th, 2019

Laser-based ultrasound approach provides new direction for nondestructive testing: Patches coated with nanoparticles from candle soot found to generate ultrasonic waves that can be used to monitor the structural integrity of buildings September 4th, 2019

Dashing the dream of ideal 'invisibility' cloaks for stress waves June 7th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project