Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Skoltech researchers developed new perovskite-inspired semiconductors for electronic devices

The research was showcased on the journal's cover page.

CREDIT
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
The research was showcased on the journal's cover page. CREDIT Journal of Materials Chemistry A

Abstract:
The collaborative effort of researchers from Skoltech, SB RAS Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, and RAS Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics translated into the development of advanced lead-free semiconductors for solar cells, based on complex antimony and bismuth halides. The results of their study were published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A and showcased on the journal's cover page.

Skoltech researchers developed new perovskite-inspired semiconductors for electronic devices

Moscow, Russia | Posted on May 13th, 2019

The solar cells based on complex lead halides with a perovskite-type structure are coming into sharp focus thanks to their low cost, ease of manufacturing and enhanced light-conversion efficiency of >24%. However, their mass production and wider use are hampered by toxicity and low stability of complex lead halides. To overcome these obstacles, researchers worldwide are working on designing alternative lead-free photoactive materials, particularly, based on bismuth and antimony halides. So far these solar cells have displayed poor light-conversion performance, which suggests that the charge carriers are not generated efficiently enough in the photoactive layer or have difficulty reaching the electrodes.

The team of researchers from Skoltech, SB RAS Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, and RAS Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics showed that the actual reason behind this is the non-optimal structure of the bismuth and antimony compounds.

"We found out that unhindered vertical transport of holes and electrons, which is essential for efficient operation of solar cells, is prevented by the low dimensionality of the anionic sublattice in these compounds, which is typically 0D and sometimes 1D or very rarely 2-D. As a consequence, this class of materials can work efficiently in lateral photodetectors but not in solar cells," explains professor Pavel Troshin of the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology.

Earlier, the same team suggested increasing the lattice dimensionality in bismuth and antimony complexes by introducing linker molecules, such as molecular iodine. Using this approach, which was presented in Chemistry: A European Journal, the scientists have succeeded in creating new semiconductor materials based on complex halides of bismuth and antimony with iodine, which are currently the subject of intensive research worldwide.

The same team has also designed a fundamentally new family of solar cell materials based on the perovskite-like complex antimony bromides, ASbBr6(where A is a positively charged organic ion). The ASbBr6-based solar cells have exhibited record-high light-conversion efficiency for antimony and bismuth halides. The results of this study were published in the journal Advanced Energy Materials. According to the project lead Pavel Troshin, a real breakthrough in their research came with this study, which opens up new horizons in the development of new semiconductor materials for perovskite electronics.

###

This study was made available online in December 2018 ahead of final publication in print in March 2019.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Alina Chernova

7-905-565-3633

Copyright © Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech)

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Nanometrics to Announce Second Quarter Financial Results on July 30, 2019 July 17th, 2019

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

Perovskites

Experiments show dramatic increase in solar cell output: Method for collecting two electrons from each photon could break through theoretical solar-cell efficiency limit July 5th, 2019

Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction: Phosphorene shows efficiency promise June 21st, 2019

UCI scientists create new class of two-dimensional materials: Fabrication could help unlock new quantum computing and energy technologies June 6th, 2019

Quantum rebar: Quantum dots enhance stability of solar-harvesting perovskite crystals: Researchers demonstrate that perovskite crystals and quantum dots working together can increase stability of solar materials May 24th, 2019

Possible Futures

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

Dresden physicists use nanostructures to free photons for highly efficient white OLEDs: Trapped light particles July 12th, 2019

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries July 12th, 2019

Chip Technology

Nanometrics to Announce Second Quarter Financial Results on July 30, 2019 July 17th, 2019

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Engineers revolutionize molecular microscopy: Single molecules measure electrical potentials July 12th, 2019

'Tsunami' on a silicon chip: a world first for light waves: Sydney-Singapore team manipulates soliton photonic waves on a silicon chip July 5th, 2019

Discoveries

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries July 12th, 2019

Announcements

Nanometrics to Announce Second Quarter Financial Results on July 30, 2019 July 17th, 2019

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries July 12th, 2019

Energy

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Experiments show dramatic increase in solar cell output: Method for collecting two electrons from each photon could break through theoretical solar-cell efficiency limit July 5th, 2019

Black (nano)gold combat climate change July 5th, 2019

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level June 24th, 2019

Solar/Photovoltaic

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Experiments show dramatic increase in solar cell output: Method for collecting two electrons from each photon could break through theoretical solar-cell efficiency limit July 5th, 2019

Black (nano)gold combat climate change July 5th, 2019

Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction: Phosphorene shows efficiency promise June 21st, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project