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Home > Press > Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA

A new biosensor could someday detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women's blood. 
Credit: Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com
A new biosensor could someday detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women's blood. Credit: Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

Abstract:
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Down syndrome is the most common birth defect, occurring once in every 700 births. However, traditional non-invasive prenatal tests for the condition are unreliable or carry risks for the mother and fetus. Now, researchers have developed a sensitive new biosensor that could someday be used to detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women's blood. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.

Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA

Washington, DC | Posted on February 14th, 2019

Characterized by variable degrees of intellectual and developmental problems, Down syndrome is caused by the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. To screen for the condition, pregnant women can have ultrasound scans or indirect blood biomarker tests, but misdiagnosis rates are high. Amniocentesis, in which doctors insert a needle into the uterus to collect amniotic fluid, provides a definitive diagnosis, but the procedure poses risks to both the pregnant woman and the fetus. The emerging method of whole-genome sequencing is highly accurate, but it is a slow and expensive process. Zhiyong Zhang and colleagues wanted to develop a fast, sensitive and cost-effective test that could detect elevated DNA concentrations of chromosome 21 DNA in pregnant women's blood.

The researchers used field-effect transistor biosensor chips based on a single layer of molybdenum disulfide. They attached gold nanoparticles to the surface. On the nanoparticles, they immobilized probe DNA sequences that can recognize a specific sequence from chromosome 21. When the team added chromosome 21 DNA fragments to the sensor, they bound to the probes, causing a drop in the electrical current of the device. The biosensor could detect DNA concentrations as low as 0.1 fM/L, which is much more sensitive than other reported field-effect transistor DNA sensors. The researchers say that eventually, the test could be used to compare levels of chromosome 21 DNA in blood with that of another chromosome, such as 13, to determine if there are extra copies, suggesting a fetus has Down syndrome.

The authors acknowledge funding from the National Key Research & Development Program, the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission.

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About American Chemical Society
The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

Note: ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies.

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Contacts:
Guangyu Zhang, Ph.D.
Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Beijing 100191
China


or

Zhiyong Zhang, Ph.D.
Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics
Peking University
Beijing 100871
China
Phone: +86-10-62768137

Copyright © American Chemical Society

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