Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA

A new biosensor could someday detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women's blood. 
Credit: Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com
A new biosensor could someday detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women's blood. Credit: Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

Abstract:
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Down syndrome is the most common birth defect, occurring once in every 700 births. However, traditional non-invasive prenatal tests for the condition are unreliable or carry risks for the mother and fetus. Now, researchers have developed a sensitive new biosensor that could someday be used to detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women's blood. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.

Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA

Washington, DC | Posted on February 14th, 2019

Characterized by variable degrees of intellectual and developmental problems, Down syndrome is caused by the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. To screen for the condition, pregnant women can have ultrasound scans or indirect blood biomarker tests, but misdiagnosis rates are high. Amniocentesis, in which doctors insert a needle into the uterus to collect amniotic fluid, provides a definitive diagnosis, but the procedure poses risks to both the pregnant woman and the fetus. The emerging method of whole-genome sequencing is highly accurate, but it is a slow and expensive process. Zhiyong Zhang and colleagues wanted to develop a fast, sensitive and cost-effective test that could detect elevated DNA concentrations of chromosome 21 DNA in pregnant women's blood.

The researchers used field-effect transistor biosensor chips based on a single layer of molybdenum disulfide. They attached gold nanoparticles to the surface. On the nanoparticles, they immobilized probe DNA sequences that can recognize a specific sequence from chromosome 21. When the team added chromosome 21 DNA fragments to the sensor, they bound to the probes, causing a drop in the electrical current of the device. The biosensor could detect DNA concentrations as low as 0.1 fM/L, which is much more sensitive than other reported field-effect transistor DNA sensors. The researchers say that eventually, the test could be used to compare levels of chromosome 21 DNA in blood with that of another chromosome, such as 13, to determine if there are extra copies, suggesting a fetus has Down syndrome.

The authors acknowledge funding from the National Key Research & Development Program, the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission.

####

About American Chemical Society
The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

Note: ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Guangyu Zhang, Ph.D.
Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Beijing 100191
China


or

Zhiyong Zhang, Ph.D.
Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics
Peking University
Beijing 100871
China
Phone: +86-10-62768137

Copyright © American Chemical Society

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM's quantum computer March 14th, 2019

When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum: A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material March 12th, 2019

Possible Futures

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Nanomedicine

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Begins Dosing in Phase 1 Study of ARO-APOC3 for Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia March 11th, 2019

New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors: Near-infrared technology pinpoints fluorescent probes deep within living tissue; may be used to detect cancer earlier March 8th, 2019

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV: The nanoparticle platform for this respiratory syncytial virus study will be applied to vaccine research on flu, HIV, and more; Seattle startup Icosavax will advance related clinical trials March 8th, 2019

CEA-Leti Breakthrough Opens Path to New Vaccine for HIV: Lipidots Platform Strengthens Immune Response to Protein That Is Key to HIV Vaccine; Results Presented in Nature Publishing Group’s npj Vaccines February 27th, 2019

Sensors

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields: MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields in more than one dimension March 15th, 2019

Oxford Instruments and partners launch EU Horizon 2020 project ULISSES: Air sensors for everyone, everywhere March 7th, 2019

With nanopore sensing, VCU physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles: The researchers' findings 'open the door to observe all kinds of interesting phenomenon on nanosurfaces,' an area of great interest to chemists February 21st, 2019

CEA-Leti & Stanford Target Edge-AI Apps with Breakthrough Memory Cell: Paper at ISSCC 2019 Presents Proof-of-Concept Multi-Bit Chip That Overcomes NVM’s Read/Write, Latency and Integration Challenges February 20th, 2019

Discoveries

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Announcements

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Nanobiotechnology

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Begins Dosing in Phase 1 Study of ARO-APOC3 for Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia March 11th, 2019

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV: The nanoparticle platform for this respiratory syncytial virus study will be applied to vaccine research on flu, HIV, and more; Seattle startup Icosavax will advance related clinical trials March 8th, 2019

Nanotechnology Gives Mice Night Vision—Are Humans Next? March 2nd, 2019

CEA-Leti Breakthrough Opens Path to New Vaccine for HIV: Lipidots Platform Strengthens Immune Response to Protein That Is Key to HIV Vaccine; Results Presented in Nature Publishing Group’s npj Vaccines February 27th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project