Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis

Illustration of a neutrophil cell membrane-coated nanoparticle.

CREDIT
Qiangzhe Zhang/Nature Nanotechnology
Illustration of a neutrophil cell membrane-coated nanoparticle. CREDIT Qiangzhe Zhang/Nature Nanotechnology

Abstract:
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed neutrophil "nanosponges" that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthritis in two mouse models. Administering the nanosponges early on also prevented the disease from developing.

Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis

San Diego, CA | Posted on September 3rd, 2018

The work is published Sept. 3 in Nature Nanotechnology.

"Nanosponges are a new paradigm of treatment to block pathological molecules from triggering disease in the body," said senior author Liangfang Zhang, a nanoengineering professor at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. "Rather than creating treatments to block a few specific types of pathological molecules, we are developing a platform that can block a broad spectrum of them, and this way we can treat and prevent disease more effectively and efficiently."

This work is one of the latest examples of therapeutic nanosponges developed by Zhang's lab. Zhang, who is affiliated with the Institute of Engineering in Medicine and Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego, and his team previously developed red blood cell nanosponges to combat and prevent MRSA infections and macrophage nanosponges to treat and manage sepsis.

The new nanosponges are nanoparticles of biodegradable polymer coated with the cell membranes of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell.

Neutrophils are among the immune system's first responders against invading pathogens. They are also known to play a role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic autoimmune disease that causes painful inflammation in the joints and can ultimately lead to damage of cartilage and bone tissue.

When rheumatoid arthritis develops, cells in the joints produce inflammatory proteins called cytokines. Release of cytokines signals neutrophils to enter the joints. Once there, cytokines bind to receptors on the neutrophil surfaces, activating them to release more cytokines, which in turn draws more neutrophils to the joints and so on.

The nanosponges essentially nip this inflammatory cascade in the bud. By acting as tiny neutrophil decoys, they intercept cytokines and stop them from signaling even more neutrophils to the joints, reducing inflammation and joint damage.

These nanosponges offer a promising alternative to current treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. Some monoclonal antibody drugs, for example, have helped patients manage symptoms of the disease, but they work by neutralizing only specific types of cytokines. This is not sufficient to treat the disease, said Zhang, because there are so many different types of cytokines and pathological molecules involved.

"Neutralizing just one or two types might not be as effective. So our approach is to take neutrophil cell membranes, which naturally have receptors to bind all these different types of cytokines, and use them to manage an entire population of inflammatory molecules," said Zhang.

"This strategy removes the need to identify specific cytokines or inflammatory signals in the process. Using entire neutrophil cell membranes, we're cutting off all these inflammatory signals at once," said first author Qiangzhe Zhang, a Ph.D. student in Professor Liangfang Zhang's research group at UC San Diego.

To make the neutrophil nanosponges, the researchers first developed a method to separate neutrophils from whole blood. They then processed the cells in a solution that causes them to swell and burst, leaving the membranes behind. The membranes were then broken up into much smaller pieces. Mixing them with ball-shaped nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymer fused the neutrophil cell membranes onto the nanoparticle surfaces.

"One of the major challenges of this work was streamlining this entire process, from isolating neutrophils from blood to removing the membranes, and making this process repeatable. We spent a lot of time figuring this out and eventually created a consistent neutrophil nanosponge production line," said Qiangzhe Zhang.

In mouse models of severe rheumatoid arthritis, injecting nanosponges in inflamed joints led to reduced swelling and protected cartilage from further damage. The nanosponges performed just as well as treatments in which mice were administered a high dose of monoclonal antibodies.

The nanosponges also worked as a preventive treatment when administered prior to inducing the disease in another group of mice.

Professor Liangfang Zhang cautions that the nanosponge treatment does not eliminate the disease. "We are basically able to manage the disease. It's not completely gone. But swelling is greatly reduced and cartilage damage is minimized," he said.

The team hopes to one day see their work in clinical trials.

###

This work is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Joint Science and Technology Office for Chemical and Biological Defense (grant HDTRA1-14-1-0064) and the National Science Foundation (grant DMR-1505699).

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Liezel Labios

858-246-1124

Copyright © University of California, San Diego

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Paper title: "Neutrophil membrane-coated nanoparticles inhibit synovial inflammation and alleviate joint damage in inflammatory arthritis." Co-authors include Diana Dehaini, Yue Zhang, Julia Zhou, Xiangyu Chen, Lifen Zhang, Ronnie H. Fang and Weiwei Gao, all at UC San Diego.:

Related News Press

News and information

Research Reveals Exotic Quantum States in Double-Layer Graphene: Findings shed new light on the nature of electron interactions in quantum systems and establish a potential new platform for future quantum computers June 26th, 2019

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level June 24th, 2019

Nanometrics and Rudolph Announce Merger Agreement to Create a Premier Semiconductor Process Control Company June 24th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) June 22nd, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Research Reveals Exotic Quantum States in Double-Layer Graphene: Findings shed new light on the nature of electron interactions in quantum systems and establish a potential new platform for future quantum computers June 26th, 2019

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level June 24th, 2019

Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction: Phosphorene shows efficiency promise June 21st, 2019

Ice lithography: opportunities and challenges in 3D nanofabrication June 21st, 2019

Possible Futures

Research Reveals Exotic Quantum States in Double-Layer Graphene: Findings shed new light on the nature of electron interactions in quantum systems and establish a potential new platform for future quantum computers June 26th, 2019

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level June 24th, 2019

Nanometrics and Rudolph Announce Merger Agreement to Create a Premier Semiconductor Process Control Company June 24th, 2019

Researchers report new understanding of thermoelectric materials: Discovery leads to promising new materials for converting waste heat to power June 21st, 2019

Nanomedicine

Nanometrics and Rudolph Announce Merger Agreement to Create a Premier Semiconductor Process Control Company June 24th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) June 22nd, 2019

'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin: Novel materials made with FDA-approved components could deliver large payloads of active ingredients June 21st, 2019

Millions with neurological diseases could find new option in implantable neurostimulation devices June 21st, 2019

Discoveries

Research Reveals Exotic Quantum States in Double-Layer Graphene: Findings shed new light on the nature of electron interactions in quantum systems and establish a potential new platform for future quantum computers June 26th, 2019

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level June 24th, 2019

Ice lithography: opportunities and challenges in 3D nanofabrication June 21st, 2019

Researchers report new understanding of thermoelectric materials: Discovery leads to promising new materials for converting waste heat to power June 21st, 2019

Announcements

Research Reveals Exotic Quantum States in Double-Layer Graphene: Findings shed new light on the nature of electron interactions in quantum systems and establish a potential new platform for future quantum computers June 26th, 2019

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level June 24th, 2019

Nanometrics and Rudolph Announce Merger Agreement to Create a Premier Semiconductor Process Control Company June 24th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) June 22nd, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Research Reveals Exotic Quantum States in Double-Layer Graphene: Findings shed new light on the nature of electron interactions in quantum systems and establish a potential new platform for future quantum computers June 26th, 2019

'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin: Novel materials made with FDA-approved components could deliver large payloads of active ingredients June 21st, 2019

Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction: Phosphorene shows efficiency promise June 21st, 2019

Ice lithography: opportunities and challenges in 3D nanofabrication June 21st, 2019

Military

'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination: Rice University engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50% June 19th, 2019

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing: Princeton researchers detect a robust Majorana quasiparticle and show how it can be turned on and off June 14th, 2019

Dashing the dream of ideal 'invisibility' cloaks for stress waves June 7th, 2019

Flexible generators turn movement into energy: Rice University's laser-induced graphene nanogenerators could power future wearables June 2nd, 2019

Nanobiotechnology

Nanometrics and Rudolph Announce Merger Agreement to Create a Premier Semiconductor Process Control Company June 24th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) June 22nd, 2019

'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin: Novel materials made with FDA-approved components could deliver large payloads of active ingredients June 21st, 2019

Millions with neurological diseases could find new option in implantable neurostimulation devices June 21st, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project