Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Connecting the (Nano) Dots: NIST Says Big-Picture Thinking Can Advance Nanoparticle Manufacturing

Electron micrograph showing gallium arsenide nanoparticles of varying shapes and sizes. Such heterogeneity can increase costs and limit profits when making nanoparticles into products. A new NIST study recommends that researchers, manufacturers and administrators work together to solve this, and other common problems, in nanoparticle manufacturing.

Credit: A. Demotiere, E. Shevchenko/Argonne National Laboratory
Electron micrograph showing gallium arsenide nanoparticles of varying shapes and sizes. Such heterogeneity can increase costs and limit profits when making nanoparticles into products. A new NIST study recommends that researchers, manufacturers and administrators work together to solve this, and other common problems, in nanoparticle manufacturing. Credit: A. Demotiere, E. Shevchenko/Argonne National Laboratory

Abstract:
Nanoparticle manufacturing, the production of material units less than 100 nanometers in size (100,000 times smaller than a marble), is proving the adage that “good things come in small packages.” Today’s engineered nanoparticles are integral components of everything from the quantum dot nanocrystals coloring the brilliant displays of state-of-the-art televisions to the miniscule bits of silver helping bandages protect against infection. However, commercial ventures seeking to profit from these tiny building blocks face quality control issues that, if unaddressed, can reduce efficiency, increase production costs and limit commercial impact of the products that incorporate them.

Connecting the (Nano) Dots: NIST Says Big-Picture Thinking Can Advance Nanoparticle Manufacturing

Gaithersburg, MD | Posted on August 22nd, 2018

To help overcome these obstacles, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nonprofit World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC) advocate that nanoparticle researchers, manufacturers and administrators “connect the dots” by considering their shared challenges broadly and tackling them collectively rather than individually. This includes transferring knowledge across disciplines, coordinating actions between organizations and sharing resources to facilitate solutions.

The recommendations are presented in a new paper in the journal ACS Applied Nano Materials.

“We looked at the big picture of nanoparticle manufacturing to identify problems that are common for different materials, processes and applications,” said NIST physical scientist Samuel Stavis, lead author of the paper. “Solving these problems could advance the entire enterprise.”

The new paper provides a framework to better understand these issues. It is the culmination of a study initiated by a workshop organized by NIST that focused on the fundamental challenge of reducing or mitigating heterogeneity, the inadvertent variations in nanoparticle size, shape and other characteristics that occur during their manufacture.

“Heterogeneity can have significant consequences in nanoparticle manufacturing,” said NIST chemical engineer and co-author Jeffrey Fagan.

In their paper, the authors noted that the most profitable innovations in nanoparticle manufacturing minimize heterogeneity during the early stages of the operation, reducing the need for subsequent processing. This decreases waste, simplifies characterization and improves the integration of nanoparticles into products, all of which save money.

The authors illustrated the point by comparing the production of gold nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes. For gold, they stated, the initial synthesis costs can be high, but the similarity of the nanoparticles produced requires less purification and characterization. Therefore, they can be made into a variety of products, such as sensors, at relatively low costs.

In contrast, the more heterogeneous carbon nanotubes are less expensive to synthesize but require more processing to yield those with desired properties. The added costs during manufacturing currently make nanotubes only practical for high-value applications such as digital logic devices.

“Although these nanoparticles and their end products are very different, the stakeholders in their manufacture can learn much from each other’s best practices,” said NIST materials scientist and co-author J. Alexander Liddle. “By sharing knowledge, they might be able to improve both seemingly disparate operations.”

Finding ways like this to connect the dots, the authors said, is critically important for new ventures seeking to transfer nanoparticle technologies from laboratory to market.

“Nanoparticle manufacturing can become so costly that funding expires before the end product can be commercialized,” said WTEC nanotechnology consultant and co-author Michael Stopa. “In our paper, we outlined several opportunities for improving the odds that new ventures will survive their journeys through this technology transfer ‘valley of death.’”

Finally, the authors considered how manufacturing challenges and innovations are affecting the ever-growing number of applications for nanoparticles, including those in the areas of electronics, energy, health care and materials.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael E. Newman

(301) 975-3025

Copyright © National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Paper: S.M. Stavis, J.A. Fagan, M. Stopa and J.A. Liddle. Nanoparticle manufacturing—heterogeneity through processes to products. ACS Applied Nano Materials, August 2018. DOI: 10.1021/acsanm.8b01239:

Related News Press

News and information

Nanometrics to Announce Fourth Quarter and Full Year Financial Results on February 5, 2019 January 18th, 2019

ULVAC Inc., and Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology collaborate to bring Atomic Scale Processing solutions to the Japanese Power and RF markets January 18th, 2019

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics January 18th, 2019

Laboratories

Revealing hidden spin: Unlocking new paths toward high-temperature superconductors: Berkeley Lab researchers uncover insights into superconductivity, leading potentially to more efficient power transmission January 4th, 2019

Carrying and releasing nanoscale cargo with 'nanowrappers': Nanocubes with hollow interiors and surface openings whose shape, size, and location are precisely controlled could be used to load and unload materials for biomedical, catalysis, and optical sensing applications January 3rd, 2019

New composite advances lignin as a renewable 3D printing material December 28th, 2018

Scientists use magnetic defects to achieve electromagnetic wave breakthrough December 20th, 2018

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics January 18th, 2019

Nanobiotix Plans to Conduct Registered Public Offering in the United States January 17th, 2019

2D materials may enable electric vehicles to get 500 miles on a single charge January 11th, 2019

Spintronics 'miracle material' put to the test: Physicists build devices using mineral perovskite January 11th, 2019

Possible Futures

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics January 18th, 2019

Nanobiotix Plans to Conduct Registered Public Offering in the United States January 17th, 2019

Power stations driven by light: More efficient solar cells imitate photosynthesis January 16th, 2019

Chip Technology

Nanometrics to Announce Fourth Quarter and Full Year Financial Results on February 5, 2019 January 18th, 2019

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics January 18th, 2019

Light up logic: Engineers from UTokyo and RIKEN perform computational logic with light January 18th, 2019

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Drilling speed increased by 20% – yet another upgrade in the oil & gas sector made possible by graphene nanotubes January 15th, 2019

Chemical synthesis of nanotubes: Nanometer-sized tubes made from simple benzene molecules January 11th, 2019

'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures: Rice U. invention can use fluorescing carbon nanotubes to reveal stress in aircraft, structures November 15th, 2018

Ultrasensitive toxic gas detector October 31st, 2018

Nanomedicine

Nanobiotix Plans to Conduct Registered Public Offering in the United States January 17th, 2019

Chirality in 'real-time' January 14th, 2019

Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array January 9th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Begins Dosing in Phase 1 Study of ARO-ANG3 for Treatment of Dyslipidemias and Metabolic Diseases January 7th, 2019

Sensors

Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array January 9th, 2019

Study on low noise, high-performance transistors may bring innovations in electronics December 28th, 2018

Emerging trends in advanced nano-materials based electrochemical geno-sensors December 28th, 2018

Oxford Instruments participates in the launch of the European Quantum Technology Flagship Programme ‘QMiCS’ December 13th, 2018

Discoveries

Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria: New technology can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes January 18th, 2019

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics January 18th, 2019

Light up logic: Engineers from UTokyo and RIKEN perform computational logic with light January 18th, 2019

Announcements

Nanometrics to Announce Fourth Quarter and Full Year Financial Results on February 5, 2019 January 18th, 2019

ULVAC Inc., and Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology collaborate to bring Atomic Scale Processing solutions to the Japanese Power and RF markets January 18th, 2019

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics January 18th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria: New technology can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes January 18th, 2019

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics January 18th, 2019

New materials could help improve the performance of perovskite solar cells January 11th, 2019

Industrial

Iran Develops Water-Repellent Nano-Paint December 5th, 2018

CEA-Leti Moves 3D Sequential Integration Closer to Commercialization: Paper Presented at IEDM 2018 Describes Breakthroughs in Six Process Steps December 3rd, 2018

CEA-Leti and Silvaco to Develop GAA SPICE Compact Models for Circuit Design and Technology Co-optimization: Project Combines CEA-Leti’s Compact Modeling Expertise And Silvaco’s Extensive Experience in SPICE Compact Model Integration and Extraction December 3rd, 2018

CEA-Leti Extends 300mm Line and Adds Avenues for Developing Disruptive Technologies: Execution Relies on CEA-Leti’s Fully Implemented Technology With Module-Level Innovations & Devices and Their Architectures December 3rd, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project