Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Novel nanoparticle-based approach detects and treats oral plaque without drugs

In this illustration, nanoparticles attach to or are taken up by the bacteria cells. Pan and his students are the first group to demonstrate that early detection of dental plaque in the clinic is possible using the regular intraoral X-ray machine which can seek out harmful bacteria populations.

CREDIT
University of Illinois Laboratory for Materials in Medicine.
In this illustration, nanoparticles attach to or are taken up by the bacteria cells. Pan and his students are the first group to demonstrate that early detection of dental plaque in the clinic is possible using the regular intraoral X-ray machine which can seek out harmful bacteria populations.

CREDIT
University of Illinois Laboratory for Materials in Medicine.
In this illustration, nanoparticles attach to or are taken up by the bacteria cells. Pan and his students are the first group to demonstrate that early detection of dental plaque in the clinic is possible using the regular intraoral X-ray machine which can seek out harmful bacteria populations. CREDIT University of Illinois Laboratory for Materials in Medicine. In this illustration, nanoparticles attach to or are taken up by the bacteria cells. Pan and his students are the first group to demonstrate that early detection of dental plaque in the clinic is possible using the regular intraoral X-ray machine which can seek out harmful bacteria populations. CREDIT University of Illinois Laboratory for Materials in Medicine.

Abstract:
When the good and bad bacteria in our mouth become imbalanced, the bad bacteria form a biofilm (aka plaque), which can cause cavities, and if left untreated over time, can lead to cardiovascular and other inflammatory diseases like diabetes and bacterial pneumonia.

Novel nanoparticle-based approach detects and treats oral plaque without drugs

Urbana, IL | Posted on August 17th, 2018

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois has recently devised a practical nanotechnology-based method for detecting and treating the harmful bacteria that cause plaque and lead to tooth decay and other detrimental conditions.

Bioengineering Associate Professor Dipanjan Pan (seated) and doctoral student Fatemeh Ostadhossein have demonstrated a drug-free, nanotechnology-based method for detecting and destroying the bacteria that causes dental plaque.

Oral plaque is invisible to the eye so dentists currently visualize it with disclosing agents, which they administer to patients in the form of a dissolvable tablet or brush-on swab. While useful in helping patients see the extent of their plaque, these methods are unable to identify the difference between good and bad bacteria.

"Presently in the clinic, detection of dental plaque is highly subjective and only depends on the dentist's visual evaluation," said Bioengineering Associate Professor Dipanjan Pan, head of the research team. "We have demonstrated for the first time that early detection of dental plaque in the clinic is possible using the regular intraoral X-ray machine which can seek out harmful bacteria populations."

In order to accomplish this, Fatemeh Ostadhossein, a Bioengineering graduate student in Pan's group, developed a plaque detection probe that works in conjunction with common X-ray technology and which is capable of finding specific harmful bacteria known as Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) in a complex biofilm network. Additionally, they also demonstrated that by tweaking the chemical composition of the probe, it can be used to target and destroy the S. mutans bacteria.

The probe is comprised of nanoparticles made of hafnium oxide (HfO2), a non-toxic metal that is currently under clinical trial for internal use in humans. In their study, the team demonstrated the efficacy of the probe to identify biochemical markers present at the surface of the bacterial biofilm and simultaneously destroy S. mutans. They conducted their study on Sprague Dawley rats.

In practice, Pan envisions a dentist applying the probe on the patient's teeth and using the X-ray machine to accurately visualize the extent of the biofilm plaque. If the plaque is deemed severe, then the dentist would follow up with the administering of the therapeutic HfO2 nanoparticles in the form of a dental paste.

In their study, the team compared the therapeutic ability of their nanoparticles with Chlorhexidine, a chemical currently used by dentists to eradicate biofilm. "Our HfO2 nanoparticles are far more efficient at killing the bacteria and reducing the biofilm burden both in cell cultures of bacteria and in [infected] rats," said Ostadhossein, noting that their new technology is also much safer than conventional treatment.

The nanoparticles' therapeutic effect is due, said Pan, to their unique surface chemistry, which provides a latch and kill mechanism. "This mechanism sets our work apart from previously pursued nanoparticle-based approaches where the medicinal effect comes from anti-biotics encapsulated in the particles," said Pan, also a faculty member of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine and the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. "This is good because our approach avoids anti-biotic resistance issues and it's safe and highly scalable, making it well-suited for eventual clinical translation."

In addition to Pan and Ostadhossein, other members of the research team include bioengineering post-doctoral researcher Santosh Misra, visiting scholar Indu Tripathi, undergraduate Valeriya Kravchuk, visiting scholar Gururaja Vulugundam; and Veterinary Medicine clinical assistant professor Denae LoBato and adjunct assistant professor Laura Selmic.

###

Their work is described in the paper, "Dual purpose hafnium oxide nanoparticles offer imaging Streptococcus mutans dental biofilm and fight it In vivo via a drug free approach," published online on July 30, 2018, in the journal Biomaterials. The research was funded by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Children's Discovery Institute and the American Heart Association.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Dipanjan Pan

217-244-2938

Copyright © University of Illinois College of Engineering

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Wearable sensors that detect gas leaks April 19th, 2021

JEOL USA Welcomes New Managing Director, Hidetaka Sawada April 19th, 2021

FSU engineers improve performance of high-temperature superconductor wires April 16th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Results April 16th, 2021

Imaging

JEOL USA Welcomes New Managing Director, Hidetaka Sawada April 19th, 2021

Possible Futures

Wearable sensors that detect gas leaks April 19th, 2021

New nanoscale device for spin technology: Spin waves could unlock the next generation of computer technology, a new component allows physicists to control them April 16th, 2021

New tech builds ultralow-loss integrated photonic circuits April 16th, 2021

Oregon scientists create mechanism to precisely control soundwaves in metamaterials: Theoretical modeling shows that designer materials incorporating drum-like membranes allow precise stoppage and reversal of sound pulses April 16th, 2021

Nanomedicine

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Results April 16th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Results April 16th, 2021

French & Swiss Scientists Demonstrate ‘All-in-One’ Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis: Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy’s Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Lab April 13th, 2021

Antibody binding-site conserved across COVID-19 virus variants: The structural revelation could have implications as a therapeutic target in all SARS-CoV-2 variants April 9th, 2021

Discoveries

New nanoscale device for spin technology: Spin waves could unlock the next generation of computer technology, a new component allows physicists to control them April 16th, 2021

New tech builds ultralow-loss integrated photonic circuits April 16th, 2021

Oregon scientists create mechanism to precisely control soundwaves in metamaterials: Theoretical modeling shows that designer materials incorporating drum-like membranes allow precise stoppage and reversal of sound pulses April 16th, 2021

FSU engineers improve performance of high-temperature superconductor wires April 16th, 2021

Announcements

Wearable sensors that detect gas leaks April 19th, 2021

JEOL USA Welcomes New Managing Director, Hidetaka Sawada April 19th, 2021

FSU engineers improve performance of high-temperature superconductor wires April 16th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Results April 16th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Wearable sensors that detect gas leaks April 19th, 2021

New nanoscale device for spin technology: Spin waves could unlock the next generation of computer technology, a new component allows physicists to control them April 16th, 2021

New tech builds ultralow-loss integrated photonic circuits April 16th, 2021

Oregon scientists create mechanism to precisely control soundwaves in metamaterials: Theoretical modeling shows that designer materials incorporating drum-like membranes allow precise stoppage and reversal of sound pulses April 16th, 2021

Tools

JEOL USA Welcomes New Managing Director, Hidetaka Sawada April 19th, 2021

New 3D-Bioprinter + Bioink Use Living Cells Straight From Culture Plate: Cell models mimicking natural tissue topography herald new era for biomedical research April 13th, 2021

Knowledge and Power: Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology and LayTec join forces to provide critical front end processing solutions for the production of compound semiconductor devices April 7th, 2021

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

Nanobiotechnology

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Results April 16th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Results April 16th, 2021

French & Swiss Scientists Demonstrate ‘All-in-One’ Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis: Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy’s Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Lab April 13th, 2021

Energy transmission by gold nanoparticles coupled to DNA structures April 9th, 2021

Dental

Innovations in dentistry: Navigational surgery, robotics, and nanotechnology October 2nd, 2020

First measurement of electron energy distributions, could enable sustainable energy technologies June 5th, 2020

Gas storage method could help next-generation clean energy vehicles: Tremendous amounts of hydrogen and methane can be stored in nanoscopic pores April 17th, 2020

Dental plaque is no match for catalytic nanoparticles: Twice-daily rinses of FDA-approved nanoparticles broke apart oral biofilms and prevented tooth decay in a study led by Penn researchers August 8th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project