Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > High-power electronics keep their cool with new heat-conducting crystals

Materials science and engineering professor and department head David Cahill co-led research that helped optimize the synthesis of boron arsenide – a highly thermally conductive material – to help dissipate heat inside high-powered electronics.

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer
Materials science and engineering professor and department head David Cahill co-led research that helped optimize the synthesis of boron arsenide – a highly thermally conductive material – to help dissipate heat inside high-powered electronics. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Abstract:
The inner workings of high-power electronic devices must remain cool to operate reliably. High internal temperatures can make programs run slower, freeze or shut down. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and The University of Texas, Dallas have collaborated to optimize the crystal-growing process of boron arsenide – a material that has excellent thermal properties and can effectively dissipate the heat generated in electronic devices.

High-power electronics keep their cool with new heat-conducting crystals

Champaign, IL | Posted on July 6th, 2018

The results of the study, published in the journal Science, mark the first realization of previously predicted class of ultrahigh thermal conductivity materials. Boron arsenide is not a naturally occurring material, so scientists must synthesize it in the lab, the researchers said. It also needs to have a very specific structure and low defect density for it to have peak thermal conductivity, so that its growth happens in a very controlled way.

“We studied the structural defects and measured the thermal conductivity of the boron arsenide crystals produced at UT Dallas,” said co-author David Cahill, a professor and head of the department of materials science and engineering at Illinois. “Our experiments also show that the original theory is incomplete and will need to be refined to fully understand the high thermal conductivity.”

Most of today’s high-performance computer chips and high-power electronic devices are made of silicon, a crystalline semiconducting material that does an adequate job of dissipating heat. But in combination with other cooling technology incorporated into devices, silicon can handle only so much, the team said.

Diamond has the highest known thermal conductivity – about 15 times that of silicon – but there are problems when it comes to using it for thermal management of electronics.

“Although diamond has been incorporated occasionally in demanding heat-dissipation applications, the cost of natural diamonds and structural defects in manmade diamond films make the material impractical for widespread use in electronics,” said co-author Bing Lv, a physics professor at UT Dallas.

“The boron arsenide crystals were synthesized using a technique called chemical vapor transport,” said Illinois postdoctoral researcher Qiye Zheng. “Elemental boron and arsenic are combined while in the vapor phase and then cool and condense into small crystals. We combined extensive materials characterization and trial-and-error synthesis to find the conditions that produce crystals of high enough quality.”

The Illinois team used electron microscopy and a technique called time-domain thermoreflectance to determine if the lab-grown crystals were free of the types of defects that cause a reduction in thermal conductivity.

“We measured dozens of the boron arsenide crystals produced in this study and found that the thermal conductivity of the material can be three times higher than that of best materials being used as heat spreaders today,” Zheng said.

The next step in the work will be to try other processes to improve the growth and properties of this material for large-scale applications, the researchers said.

The Office of Naval Research and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research supported this study.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
LOIS YOKSOULIAN
PHYSICAL SCIENCES EDITOR
217-244-2788


David Cahill
217-333-6753;


To reach Bing Lv

Copyright © University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

The paper “High thermal conductivity in cubic boron arsenide crystals” is available online and from the U. of I. News Bureau. DOI: 10.1126/science.aat8982:

Related News Press

News and information

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Molecular Lego blocks: Chemical data mining boosts search for new organic semiconductors February 15th, 2019

The smallest skeletons in the marine world observed in 3D by synchrotron techniques February 15th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

NRL, AFRL develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA February 14th, 2019

Laser-induced graphene gets tough, with help: Rice University lab combines conductive foam with other materials for capable new composites February 12th, 2019

Possible Futures

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Molecular Lego blocks: Chemical data mining boosts search for new organic semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

Chip Technology

NRL, AFRL develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Molecular Lego blocks: Chemical data mining boosts search for new organic semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Spintronics by 'straintronics': Switching superferromagnetism with electric-field induced strain February 15th, 2019

Picosun’s ALD encapsulation prevents electronics degradation February 15th, 2019

Nanoelectronics

Large, stable pieces of graphene produced with unique edge pattern: Breakthrough in graphene research February 1st, 2019

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Study on low noise, high-performance transistors may bring innovations in electronics December 28th, 2018

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices: Monitoring the transition from tunneling leakage current to molecular tunneling December 16th, 2018

Discoveries

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Molecular Lego blocks: Chemical data mining boosts search for new organic semiconductors February 15th, 2019

The smallest skeletons in the marine world observed in 3D by synchrotron techniques February 15th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

Materials/Metamaterials

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Laser-induced graphene gets tough, with help: Rice University lab combines conductive foam with other materials for capable new composites February 12th, 2019

Using artificial intelligence to engineer materials' properties: New system of 'strain engineering' can change a material's optical, electrical, and thermal properties February 11th, 2019

Sound and light trapped by disorder February 8th, 2019

Announcements

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

Spintronics by 'straintronics': Switching superferromagnetism with electric-field induced strain February 15th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

NRL, AFRL develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

Military

NRL, AFRL develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Laser-induced graphene gets tough, with help: Rice University lab combines conductive foam with other materials for capable new composites February 12th, 2019

Rice U. lab adds porous envelope to aluminum plasmonics: Scientists marry gas-trapping framework to light-powered nanocatalysts February 10th, 2019

Disruptive by Design: Nano Now February 1st, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project