Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Newly improved glass slide turns microscopes into thermometers: Advancement could streamline and boost scientific research all over the world, help computing industry

A photo of the experiment using a glass slide with the new coating.
CREDIT
University at Buffalo
A photo of the experiment using a glass slide with the new coating. CREDIT University at Buffalo

Abstract:
The humble glass microscope slide may be primed for a makeover.

Newly improved glass slide turns microscopes into thermometers: Advancement could streamline and boost scientific research all over the world, help computing industry

Buffalo, NY | Posted on May 2nd, 2018

A study published online today (May 2, 2018) in the journal Nature Communications describes how an updated version of this centuries-old tool can now enable scientists to see tiny objects while also measuring their temperature.

The advancement, made possible by a new transparent coating at the forefront of optics theory, has the potential to streamline and enhance scientific research worldwide, from clandestine government biology labs to high school chemistry classes.

It may also have implications in other industries, such as computers and electronics, whose products require measurement and control of heat in highly confined spaces.

"We have instruments that magnify incredibly small objects. And we have tools that measure heat, like infrared thermometers. But we haven't been able to combine them in a low-cost and reliable manner. This new coating takes a big step in that direction," says the study's co-lead author Ruogang Zhao, PhD, assistant professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Biomedical Engineering.

The department is a multidisciplinary unit formed by UB's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB.

Zhao collaborated with researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, including co-lead author Liang Feng, PhD, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, and electrical and systems engineering.

For decades, researchers have tried to combine thermal imaging and microscopy. Images produced from systems that use thermocouples lack resolution and are often too coarse for modern science. Terahertz and infrared thermal mapping techniques interfere with the microscope's lenses. Other techniques are expensive and time-consuming.

The new coating is made of a layer of acrylic glass (the same material used in most eyeglasses) that's sandwiched between two layers of transparent gold. The gold is transparent because it's only 20 nanometers thick; a typical sheet of paper is 100,000 nanometers thick.

Engineers fabricated the coating so that "exceptional points" -- the sweet spots where unusual light behavior happens -- can develop within the tri-layered structure. The coating, which significantly enhances the slide's sensitivity to light detection, would be added to slides during the manufacturing process. Either the slide or cover slip could receive the coating.

To make use of the new coating, a laser is needed. Zhao says a common helium-neon laser, which can be seamlessly integrated with most microscopes, will do the job.

Common slides, which are often bought in bulk, typically cost around 5 cents. The new coating would likely add a few pennies to the cost, Zhao says.

###

The research is supported by funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Cory Nealon

716-645-4614

Copyright © University at Buffalo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

Imaging

Big award enables study of small surfaces: Rice U.'s Matt Jones wins Packard Fellowship to view nanoscale chemical reactions October 15th, 2018

News and information

Big award enables study of small surfaces: Rice U.'s Matt Jones wins Packard Fellowship to view nanoscale chemical reactions October 15th, 2018

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Files for Regulatory Clearance to Begin Phase 1 Study of ARO-ANG3 October 15th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC October 12th, 2018

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Files for Regulatory Clearance to Begin Phase 1 Study of ARO-ANG3 October 15th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC October 12th, 2018

Tracking a Killer: UCSB, UCSD and SBP researchers trace the complex and variable pathways to the deadly condition known as sepsis October 12th, 2018

Possible Futures

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization: Efficient method for making single-atom-thick, wafer-scale materials opens up opportunities in flexible electronics October 12th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC October 12th, 2018

180 Degree Capital Corp. Announces New Portfolio Holdings Airgain, Inc., EMCORE Corporation, Lantronix, Inc. and PDL BioPharma, Inc. October 12th, 2018

Discoveries

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization: Efficient method for making single-atom-thick, wafer-scale materials opens up opportunities in flexible electronics October 12th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC October 12th, 2018

Tracking a Killer: UCSB, UCSD and SBP researchers trace the complex and variable pathways to the deadly condition known as sepsis October 12th, 2018

Announcements

Big award enables study of small surfaces: Rice U.'s Matt Jones wins Packard Fellowship to view nanoscale chemical reactions October 15th, 2018

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Files for Regulatory Clearance to Begin Phase 1 Study of ARO-ANG3 October 15th, 2018

180 Degree Capital Corp. Announces New Portfolio Holdings Airgain, Inc., EMCORE Corporation, Lantronix, Inc. and PDL BioPharma, Inc. October 12th, 2018

TUBALL single wall carbon nanotubes: No ecotoxicity found, unlike other carbon nanotubes October 12th, 2018

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Big award enables study of small surfaces: Rice U.'s Matt Jones wins Packard Fellowship to view nanoscale chemical reactions October 15th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC October 12th, 2018

Tracking a Killer: UCSB, UCSD and SBP researchers trace the complex and variable pathways to the deadly condition known as sepsis October 12th, 2018

Tools

Big award enables study of small surfaces: Rice U.'s Matt Jones wins Packard Fellowship to view nanoscale chemical reactions October 15th, 2018

Nanometrics to Announce Third Quarter Financial Results on October 30, 2018 October 10th, 2018

UCI scientists push microscopy to sub-molecular resolution: Carbon monoxide used to measure electric forces in single chemical compound October 2nd, 2018

Carbon nanodots do an ultrafine job with in vitro lung tissue: New experiments highlight the role of charge and size when it comes to carbon nanodots that mimic the effect of nanoscale pollution particles on the human lung. September 12th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project