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Home > Press > Squid sucker ring teeth material could aid reconstructive surgery, serve as eco-packaging

Teeth on squid suckers are inspiring new materials for a wide range of applications from surgery to packaging.
Credit: American Chemical Society
Teeth on squid suckers are inspiring new materials for a wide range of applications from surgery to packaging.

Credit: American Chemical Society

Abstract:
Squid tentacles are loaded with hundreds of suction cups, or suckers, and each sucker has a ring of razor-sharp "teeth" that help these mighty predators latch onto and take down prey. In a study published in the journal ACS Nano, researchers report that the proteins in these teeth could form the basis for a new generation of strong, but malleable, materials that could someday be used for reconstructive surgery, eco-friendly packaging and many other applications.

Squid sucker ring teeth material could aid reconstructive surgery, serve as eco-packaging

Washington, DC | Posted on July 2nd, 2014

Ali Miserez and colleagues explain that in previous research, they discovered that sharp, tough squid sucker ring teeth (SRT) are made entirely of proteins. That makes SRT distinct from many other natural polymers and hard tissues (such as bones) that require the addition of minerals or other substances to perform the right activities, they say. The team already had identified one "suckerin" protein and deciphered its genetic code. They also found that this protein could be remolded into different shapes. But what about the other suckerins in SRT?

In the new study, they identified 37 additional SRT proteins from two squid species and a cuttlefish. The team also determined their architectures, including how their components formed what is known as "ß-sheets." Spider silks also form these structures, which help make them strong. And just as silk is finding application in many areas, so too could SRT proteins, which could be easier to make in the lab and more eco-friendly to process into usable materials than silk. "We envision SRT-based materials as artificial ligaments, scaffolds to grow bone and as sustainable materials for packaging, substituting for today's products made with fossil fuels," says Miserez. "There is no shortage of ideas, though we are just beginning to work on these proteins."

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The authors acknowledge funding from the Singapore Ministry of Education, the Singapore National Research Foundation and the Biomedical Research Council of the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR).

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About American Chemical Society
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael Bernstein

202-872-6042

Ali Miserez, Ph.D.
School of Materials Science and Engineering
School of Biological Sciences
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore 639798
Phone: +65-6316-8979


Paul Andre Guerette, Ph.D.


or Shawn Hoon, Ph.D

Copyright © American Chemical Society

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