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Home > Press > Antibacterial Nanocomposite Produced in Iran's N. Science, Technology Research Institute

Abstract:
Iranian chemistry researchers from Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute succeeded in the production of an antibacterial nanocomposite that can be used in medical industries and dentistry.

Antibacterial Nanocomposite Produced in Iran's N. Science, Technology Research Institute

Tehran, Iran | Posted on May 23rd, 2014

This nanocomposite was produced through a simple method and it has high antibacterial properties.

Gamma radiation method was used in the production of the nanocomposite. Simplicity, not being complicated, and the clean mechanism of the process are among the advantages of this method in comparison with other chemical and physical methods for the production of nanoparticles. Among other advantages of this method, mention can be made of the possibility to produce nanostructured particles in homogenous shape, high purity, and narrow size distribution, production of pure metallic elements without the formation of bi-products, and the possibility to carry out the reaction in aqueous media without the use of toxic reductive materials.

According to Dr. A'zam Akhavan, one of the researchers, the release of silver ion at nanometric scale is different from the release of silver ion derivatives. Silver nanoparticles act as a storage tank full of silver ions, and the ions are gradually released in the presence of water and oxygen dissolved in water. As a result, silver ions are released in a controlled manner at a longer period and they preserve their antibacterial properties for a longer time.

The results showed that silver nanoparticles are formed within the structure of hydroxyapatite with cubic crystalline structure and mean particle size of less than 50 nm without creating any noticeable change in the chemical structure of hydroxyapatite. Antibacterial test shows that the produced nanocomposites have better antibacterial properties against E. coli gram negative bacteria than against S. aureus gram positive bacteria.

Results of the research have been published in Radiation Physics and Chemistry, vol. 98, issue 1, January 2014, pp. 46-50.

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