Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Making nanoelectronics last longer for medical devices, 'cyborgs'

Recording the beats of individual heart cells with tiny implantable devices is getting closer to reality.
Credit: RKaulitzki/iStock/Thinkstock
Recording the beats of individual heart cells with tiny implantable devices is getting closer to reality.

Credit: RKaulitzki/iStock/Thinkstock

Abstract:
The debut of cyborgs who are part human and part machine may be a long way off, but researchers say they now may be getting closer. In a study published in ACS' journal Nano Letters, they report development of a coating that makes nanoelectronics much more stable in conditions mimicking those in the human body. The advance could also aid in the development of very small implanted medical devices for monitoring health and disease.

Making nanoelectronics last longer for medical devices, 'cyborgs'

Washington, DC | Posted on February 19th, 2014

Charles Lieber and colleagues note that nanoelectronic devices with nanowire components have unique abilities to probe and interface with living cells. They are much smaller than most implanted medical devices used today. For example, a pacemaker that regulates the heart is the size of a U.S. 50-cent coin, but nanoelectronics are so small that several hundred such devices would fit in the period at the end of this sentence. Laboratory versions made of silicon nanowires can detect disease biomarkers and even single virus cells, or record heart cells as they beat. Lieber's team also has integrated nanoelectronics into living tissues in three dimensions — creating a "cyborg tissue." One obstacle to the practical, long-term use of these devices is that they typically fall apart within weeks or days when implanted. In the current study, the researchers set out to make them much more stable.

They found that coating silicon nanowires with a metal oxide shell allowed nanowire devices to last for several months. This was in conditions that mimicked the temperature and composition of the inside of the human body. In preliminary studies, one shell material appears to extend the lifespan of nanoelectronics to about two years.

###

The authors acknowledge funding from the National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award and the National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship.

####

About American Chemical Society
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact .

Follow us: Twitter | Facebook

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael Bernstein

202-872-6042

Charles Lieber, Ph.D.
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
School of Engineering and Applied Science
Harvard University
Cambridge, Mass. 02138

Copyright © American Chemical Society

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

DOWNLOAD FULL-TEXT ARTICLE - “Long Term Stability of Nanowire Nanoelectronics in Physiological Environments”

Related News Press

News and information

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Searching for a nanotech self-organizing principle May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Brain-Computer Interfaces

Physicists build 'electronic synapses' for neural networks April 21st, 2016

Graphene shown to safely interact with neurons in the brain January 31st, 2016

Tiny electronic implants monitor brain injury, then melt away January 19th, 2016

UCLA scientists create graphene barrier to precisely control molecules for making nanoelectronics January 19th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Personal cooling units on the horizon April 29th, 2016

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Nanoparticles hold promise as double-edged sword against genital herpes April 28th, 2016

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Files for Regulatory Clearance to Begin Phase 1/2 Study of ARC-521 April 28th, 2016

The Translational Research Center at the University Hospital of Erlangen in Germany uses the ZetaView from Particle Metrix to quantify extracellular vesicles such as exosomes April 28th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

With simple process, UW-Madison engineers fabricate fastest flexible silicon transistor April 21st, 2016

All powered up: UCI chemists create battery technology with off-the-charts charging capacity April 21st, 2016

Discoveries

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Announcements

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Searching for a nanotech self-organizing principle May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Alliances/Trade associations/Partnerships/Distributorships

Electrically Conductive Graphene Ink Enables Printing of Biosensors April 23rd, 2016

Leti Extends Collaboration with Qualcomm on CoolCubeTM 3D Integration Technology for High-Density, High-Performance ICs: Collaboration Goals Include Building an Ecosystem To Take the Chip-stacking Technology from Design to Fabrication April 13th, 2016

FEI Partners with Five Pharmaceutical Companies, the Medical Research Council and the University of Cambridge to form Cryo-EM Research Consortium April 5th, 2016

Strem Chemicals and SONA Nanotech Sign Distribution Agreement for the World’s First Gold Nanorods Synthesized without CTAB February 24th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic