Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Atomic-Scale Catalysts May Produce Cheap Hydrogen

Researchers found MoS2 thin films are effective catalysts for hydrogen production.
Researchers found MoS2 thin films are effective catalysts for hydrogen production.

Abstract:
"Layer-dependent Electrocatalysis of MoS2 for Hydrogen Evolution"

Authors: Yifei Yu, Shengyang Huang, Yanpeng Li, and Linyou Cao, North Carolina State University; Stephan Steinmann and Weitao Yang, Duke University

Published: Jan. 16, 2014, Nano Letters

DOI: 10.1021/nl403620g

Abstract: The quantitative correlation of the catalytic activity with microscopic structure of heterogeneous catalysts is a major challenge for the field of catalysis science. It requests synergistic capabilities to tailor the structure with atomic scale precision and to control the catalytic reaction to proceed through well-defined pathways. Here we leverage on the controlled growth of MoS2 atomically thin films to demonstrate that the catalytic activity of MoS2 for the hydrogen evolution reaction decreases by a factor of ~4.47 for the addition of every one more layer. Similar layer dependence is also found in edge-riched MoS2 pyramid platelets. This layer-dependent electrocatalysis can be correlated to the hopping of electrons in the vertical direction of MoS2 layers over an interlayer potential barrier. Our experimental results suggest the potential barrier to be 0.119V, consistent with theoretical calculations. Different from the conventional wisdom, which thinks that the number of edge sites is important, our results suggest that increasing the hopping efficiency of electrons in the vertical direction is a key for the development of high-efficiency two-dimensional material catalysts.

Atomic-Scale Catalysts May Produce Cheap Hydrogen

Raleigh, NC | Posted on January 22nd, 2014

Researchers at North Carolina State University have shown that a one-atom thick film of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) may work as an effective catalyst for creating hydrogen. The work opens a new door for the production of cheap hydrogen.

Hydrogen holds great promise as an energy source, but the production of hydrogen from water electrolysis - freeing hydrogen from water with electricity - currently relies in large part on the use of expensive platinum catalysts. The new research shows that MoS2 atomically thin films are also effective catalysts for hydrogen production and - while not as efficient as platinum - are relatively inexpensive. (A Q&A with Cao on how this research differs from earlier studies of other catalysts for hydrogen production can be found on NC State's research blog.)

"We found that the thickness of the thin film is very important," says Dr. Linyou Cao, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at NC State and senior author of a paper describing the work. "A thin film consisting of a single layer of atoms was the most efficient, with every additional layer of atoms making the catalytic performance approximately five times worse."

The effect of the thin films' thickness came as a surprise to researchers, because it has long been thought that catalysis normally takes place along the edges of the material. Because thin films have very little ‘edge,' conventional wisdom held that thin films were essentially catalytically inactive.

But the researchers discovered that a material's thickness is important because the thinner the MoS2 thin film is, the more conductive it becomes - and the more conductive it becomes, the more effective it is as a catalyst.

"The focus has been on creating catalysts with a large ‘edge' side," Cao says. "Our work indicates that researchers may want to pay more attention to a catalyst's conductivity."

Cao developed the technique for creating high-quality MoS2 thin films at the atomic scale in 2013. The current production of hydrogen from the atomically thin film is powered by electricity. His team is working to develop a solar-powered water-splitting device that uses the MoS2 thin films to create hydrogen.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Matt Shipman
News Services
919.515.6386


Dr. Linyou Cao
919.515.5407

Copyright © North Carolina State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

The paper, “Layer-dependent Electrocatalysis of MoS2 for Hydrogen Evolution,” is published online in Nano Letters. Lead author of the paper is Yifei Yu, a Ph.D. student at NC State. Co-authors include Yanpeng Li, a Ph.D. student at NC State; Dr. Shengyang Huang, a former visiting scholar at NC State; and Drs. Stephan Steinmann and Weitao Yang of Duke University. The research was supported by U.S. Army Research Office grant W911NF-13-1-0201:

Related News Press

News and information

Rice University boots up powerful microscopes: New electron microscopes will capture images at subnanometer resolution June 29th, 2015

The Hydrogen-Fuel cell will revolutionize the economy of the world: New non-platinum and nanosized catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell June 29th, 2015

June 29th, 2015

Efforts to Use Smart Nanocarriers to Cure Leukemia Yield Promising Results June 29th, 2015

Chemistry

The Hydrogen-Fuel cell will revolutionize the economy of the world: New non-platinum and nanosized catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell June 29th, 2015

X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time: New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions June 29th, 2015

Iranian Researchers Synthesize Nanostructures with Controlled Shape, Structure June 25th, 2015

Thin films

Stanford researchers stretch a thin crystal to get better solar cells June 25th, 2015

World’s 1st Full-Color, Flexible, Skin-Like Display Developed at UCF June 24th, 2015

Picosun ALD breaks through in medical technology June 23rd, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time: New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions June 29th, 2015

Graphene breakthrough as Bosch creates magnetic sensor 100 times more sensitive than silicon equivalent June 28th, 2015

The peaks and valleys of silicon: Team of USC Viterbi School of Engineering Researchers introduce new layered semiconducting materials as silicon alternative June 27th, 2015

Building a better semiconductor: Research led by Michigan State University could someday lead to the development of new and improved semiconductors June 27th, 2015

Discoveries

The Hydrogen-Fuel cell will revolutionize the economy of the world: New non-platinum and nanosized catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell June 29th, 2015

June 29th, 2015

Efforts to Use Smart Nanocarriers to Cure Leukemia Yield Promising Results June 29th, 2015

Making new materials with micro-explosions: ANU media release: Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material June 29th, 2015

Announcements

The Hydrogen-Fuel cell will revolutionize the economy of the world: New non-platinum and nanosized catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell June 29th, 2015

June 29th, 2015

Efforts to Use Smart Nanocarriers to Cure Leukemia Yield Promising Results June 29th, 2015

Making new materials with micro-explosions: ANU media release: Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material June 29th, 2015

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

June 29th, 2015

Efforts to Use Smart Nanocarriers to Cure Leukemia Yield Promising Results June 29th, 2015

Making new materials with micro-explosions: ANU media release: Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material June 29th, 2015

Helium 'balloons' offer new path to control complex materials June 27th, 2015

Military

The peaks and valleys of silicon: Team of USC Viterbi School of Engineering Researchers introduce new layered semiconducting materials as silicon alternative June 27th, 2015

Opening a new route to photonics Berkeley lab researchers find way to control light in densely packed nanowaveguides June 27th, 2015

Spintronics advance brings wafer-scale quantum devices closer to reality June 24th, 2015

World’s 1st Full-Color, Flexible, Skin-Like Display Developed at UCF June 24th, 2015

Energy

The Hydrogen-Fuel cell will revolutionize the economy of the world: New non-platinum and nanosized catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell June 29th, 2015

June 29th, 2015

Making new materials with micro-explosions: ANU media release: Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material June 29th, 2015

X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time: New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions June 29th, 2015

Automotive/Transportation

June 29th, 2015

Buckle up for fast ionic conduction June 16th, 2015

A protective shield for sensitive catalysts: Hydrogels block harmful oxygen June 15th, 2015

Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination June 10th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project