Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Making a gem of a tiny crystal: Slowly cooled DNA transforms disordered nanoparticles into orderly crystal

Abstract:
Nature builds flawless diamonds, sapphires and other gems. Now a Northwestern University research team is the first to build near-perfect single crystals out of nanoparticles and DNA, using the same structure favored by nature.

Making a gem of a tiny crystal: Slowly cooled DNA transforms disordered nanoparticles into orderly crystal

Evanston, IL | Posted on November 27th, 2013

"Single crystals are the backbone of many things we rely on -- diamonds for beauty as well as industrial applications, sapphires for lasers and silicon for electronics," said nanoscientist Chad A. Mirkin. "The precise placement of atoms within a well-defined lattice defines these high-quality crystals.

"Now we can do the same with nanomaterials and DNA, the blueprint of life," Mirkin said. "Our method could lead to novel technologies and even enable new industries, much as the ability to grow silicon in perfect crystalline arrangements made possible the multibillion-dollar semiconductor industry."

His research group developed the "recipe" for using nanomaterials as atoms, DNA as bonds and a little heat to form tiny crystals. This single-crystal recipe builds on superlattice techniques Mirkin's lab has been developing for nearly two decades.

In this recent work, Mirkin, an experimentalist, teamed up with Monica Olvera de la Cruz, a theoretician, to evaluate the new technique and develop an understanding of it. Given a set of nanoparticles and a specific type of DNA, Olvera de la Cruz showed they can accurately predict the 3-D structure, or crystal shape, into which the disordered components will self-assemble.

Mirkin is the George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. Olvera de la Cruz is a Lawyer Taylor Professor and professor of materials science and engineering in the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. The two are senior co-authors of the study.

The results will be published Nov. 27 in the journal Nature.

The general set of instructions gives researchers unprecedented control over the type and shape of crystals they can build. The Northwestern team worked with gold nanoparticles, but the recipe can be applied to a variety of materials, with potential applications in the fields of materials science, photonics, electronics and catalysis.

A single crystal has order: its crystal lattice is continuous and unbroken throughout. The absence of defects in the material can give these crystals unique mechanical, optical and electrical properties, making them very desirable.

In the Northwestern study, strands of complementary DNA act as bonds between disordered gold nanoparticles, transforming them into an orderly crystal. The researchers determined that the ratio of the DNA linker's length to the size of the nanoparticle is critical.

"If you get the right ratio it makes a perfect crystal -- isn't that fun?" said Olvera de la Cruz, who also is a professor of chemistry in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. "That's the fascinating thing, that you have to have the right ratio. We are learning so many rules for calculating things that other people cannot compute in atoms, in atomic crystals."

The ratio affects the energy of the faces of the crystals, which determines the final crystal shape. Ratios that don't follow the recipe lead to large fluctuations in energy and result in a sphere, not a faceted crystal, she explained. With the correct ratio, the energies fluctuate less and result in a crystal every time.

"Imagine having a million balls of two colors, some red, some blue, in a container, and you try shaking them until you get alternating red and blue balls," Mirkin explained. "It will never happen.

"But if you attach DNA that is complementary to nanoparticles -- the red has one kind of DNA, say, the blue its complement -- and now you shake, or in our case, just stir in water, all the particles will find one another and link together," he said. "They beautifully assemble into a three-dimensional crystal that we predicted computationally and realized experimentally."

To achieve a self-assembling single crystal in the lab, the research team reports taking two sets of gold nanoparticles outfitted with complementary DNA linker strands. Working with approximately 1 million nanoparticles in water, they heated the solution to a temperature just above the DNA linkers' melting point and then slowly cooled the solution to room temperature, which took two or three days.

The very slow cooling process encouraged the single-stranded DNA to find its complement, resulting in a high-quality single crystal approximately three microns wide. "The process gives the system enough time and energy for all the particles to arrange themselves and find the spots they should be in," Mirkin said.

The researchers determined that the length of DNA connected to each gold nanoparticle can't be much longer than the size of the nanoparticle. In the study, the gold nanoparticles varied from five to 20 nanometers in diameter; for each, the DNA length that led to crystal formation was about 18 base pairs and six single-base "sticky ends."

"There's no reason we can't grow extraordinarily large single crystals in the future using modifications of our technique," said Mirkin, who also is a professor of medicine, chemical and biological engineering, biomedical engineering and materials science and engineering and director of Northwestern's International Institute for Nanotechnology.

The title of the paper is "DNA-mediated nanoparticle crystallization into Wulff polyhedra."

In addition to Mirkin and Olvera de la Cruz, authors of the paper are Evelyn Auyeung (first author), Ting I. N. G. Li, Andrew J. Senesi, Abrin L. Schmucker and Bridget C. Pals, all from Northwestern.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Megan Fellman

847-491-3115

Copyright © Northwestern University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

French Institutes IRT Nanoelec and CMP Team up to Offer World’s First Service for Post-process 3D Technologies on Multi-Project-Wafer March 5th, 2015

The George Washington University Opens Science and Engineering Hall, Largest Building of Its Kind in D.C.: Building Represents Significant Investment in Research Programs and Facilities; Commitment to Solve Global Problems, Improve Lives of Millions March 5th, 2015

Anousheh Ansari Wins the National Space Society's Space Pioneer Award for "Service to the Space Community" March 5th, 2015

Enhanced Graphene Components for Next Generation Racing Yacht March 5th, 2015

Chip Technology

French Institutes IRT Nanoelec and CMP Team up to Offer World’s First Service for Post-process 3D Technologies on Multi-Project-Wafer March 5th, 2015

Experiment and theory unite at last in debate over microbial nanowires: New model and experiments settle debate over metallic-like conductivity of microbial nanowires in bacterium March 4th, 2015

Magnetic vortices in nanodisks reveal information: Researchers from Dresden and Jülich use microwaves to read out information from smallest storage devices March 4th, 2015

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Self Assembly

Nanotubes self-organize and wiggle: Evolution of a nonequilibrium system demonstrates MEPP February 10th, 2015

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers January 26th, 2015

Revealed: How bacteria drill into our cells and kill them December 2nd, 2014

Live Images from the Nano-cosmos: Researchers watch layers of football molecules grow November 5th, 2014

Discoveries

Enhanced Graphene Components for Next Generation Racing Yacht March 5th, 2015

American Chemical Society Presidential Symposia: nanoscience, international chemistry March 5th, 2015

Magnetic vortices in nanodisks reveal information: Researchers from Dresden and Jülich use microwaves to read out information from smallest storage devices March 4th, 2015

CiQUS researchers obtain high-quality perovskites over large areas by a chemical method March 4th, 2015

Materials/Metamaterials

Consistent Scalable Functionalised Graphene Capacity March 5th, 2015

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Breakthrough in OLED technology March 2nd, 2015

Moving molecule writes letters: Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics February 27th, 2015

Announcements

The George Washington University Opens Science and Engineering Hall, Largest Building of Its Kind in D.C.: Building Represents Significant Investment in Research Programs and Facilities; Commitment to Solve Global Problems, Improve Lives of Millions March 5th, 2015

Anousheh Ansari Wins the National Space Society's Space Pioneer Award for "Service to the Space Community" March 5th, 2015

Enhanced Graphene Components for Next Generation Racing Yacht March 5th, 2015

Get ready for NanoDays! March 5th, 2015

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Strength in numbers: Researchers develop the first-ever quantum device that detects and corrects its own errors March 4th, 2015

Energy-generating cloth could replace batteries in wearable devices March 4th, 2015

Experiment and theory unite at last in debate over microbial nanowires: New model and experiments settle debate over metallic-like conductivity of microbial nanowires in bacterium March 4th, 2015

Magnetic vortices in nanodisks reveal information: Researchers from Dresden and Jülich use microwaves to read out information from smallest storage devices March 4th, 2015

Industrial

Consistent Scalable Functionalised Graphene Capacity March 5th, 2015

Heightened Efficiency in Purification of Wastewater Using Nanomembranes March 3rd, 2015

Novel Method to Determine Optical Purity of Drug Components March 1st, 2015

In quest for better lithium-air batteries, chemists boost carbon's stability: Nanoparticle coatings improve stability, cyclability of '3DOm' carbon February 25th, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

Experiment and theory unite at last in debate over microbial nanowires: New model and experiments settle debate over metallic-like conductivity of microbial nanowires in bacterium March 4th, 2015

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Bacteria network for food: Bacteria connect to each other and exchange nutrients February 23rd, 2015

Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step: New, block-by-block assembly method could pave way for applications in opto-electronics, drug delivery February 23rd, 2015

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication March 3rd, 2015

Breakthrough in OLED technology March 2nd, 2015

International research partnership tricks the light fantastic March 2nd, 2015

Imec Demonstrates Compact Wavelength-Division Multiplexing CMOS Silicon Photonics Transceiver March 1st, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE