Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Pressure Cooking to Improve Electric Car Batteries: By creating nanoparticles with controlled shape, engineers believe smaller, more powerful and energy efficient batteries can be built

Lithium iron phosphate battery created in Kisailus lab.
Lithium iron phosphate battery created in Kisailus lab.

Abstract:
Batteries that power electric cars have problems. They take a long time to charge. The charge doesn't hold long enough to drive long distances. They don't allow drivers to quickly accelerate. They are big and bulky.

Pressure Cooking to Improve Electric Car Batteries: By creating nanoparticles with controlled shape, engineers believe smaller, more powerful and energy efficient batteries can be built

Riverside, CA | Posted on November 19th, 2013

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have redesigned the component materials of the battery in an environmentally friendly way to solve some of these problems. By creating nanoparticles with a controlled shape, they believe smaller, more powerful and energy efficient batteries can be built. By modifying the size and shape of battery components, they aim to reduce charge times as well.

"This is a critical, fundamental step in improving the efficiency of these batteries," said David Kisailus, an associate professor of chemical and environmental engineering and lead researcher on the project.

In addition to electric cars, the redesigned batteries could be used for municipal energy storage, including energy generated by the sun and wind.

The initial findings are outlined in a just published paper called "Solvothermal Synthesis, Development and Performance of LiFePO4 Nanostructures" in the journal Crystal Growth & Design.

Kisailus, who is also the Winston Chung Endowed Professor in Energy Innovation, and Jianxin Zhu, a Ph.D. student working with Kisailus, were the lead authors of the paper. Other authors were: Joseph Fiore, Dongsheng Li, Nichola Kinsinger and Qianqian Wang, all of whom formerly worked with Kisailus; Elaine DiMasi, of Brookhaven National Laboratory; and Juchen Guo, an assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering at UC Riverside.

The researchers in Kisailus' Biomimetics and Nanostructured Materials Lab set out to improve the efficiency of Lithium-ion batteries by targeting one of the material components of the battery, the cathode.

Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4), one type of cathode, has been used in electric vehicles because of its low cost, low toxicity and thermal and chemical stability. However, its commercial potential is limited because it has poor electronic conductivity and lithium ions are not very mobile within it.

Several synthetic methods have been utilized to overcome these deficiencies by controlling particle growth. Here, Kisailus and his team used a solvothermal synthetic method, essentially placing reactants into a container and heating them up under pressure, like a pressure cooker.

Kisailus, Zhu and their team used a mixture of solvents to control the size, shape and crystallinity of the particles and then carefully monitored how the lithium iron phosphate was formed. By doing this, they were able to determine the relationship between the nanostructures they formed and their performance in batteries.

By controlling the size of nanocrystals, which were typically 5,000 times smaller than the thickness of a human hair, within shape-controlled particles of LiFePO4, Kisailus' team has shown that batteries with more power on demand may be generated.

These size and shape modulated particles offer a higher fraction of insertion points and reduced pathlengths for Li-ion transport, thus improving battery rates. Kisailus and his team are currently refining this process to not only further improve performance and reduce cost, but also implement scalability.

The research was sponsored by the Winston Chung Global Energy Center, which is named after Winston Chung, a Chinese battery inventor who has provided more than $16 million in support to the campus in recent years for clean energy research.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sean Nealon
Tel: (951) 827-1287

Twitter: seannealon

Additional Contacts

David Kisailus

Copyright © University of California - Riverside

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Download abstract - “Solvothermal Synthesis, Development and Performance of LiFePO4 Nanostructures”:

Related News Press

News and information

The International Space Elevator Consortium (ISEC) is proud to announce the 2014 Space Elevator Conference! This annual event will be held at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington from Friday, August 22nd through Sunday, August 24th August 19th, 2014

KaSAM-2014 International Conference (September 7-10, 2014, Kathmandu, Nepal) August 19th, 2014

Success in Intracellular Imaging of Cesium Distribution in Plants Used for Cesium Absorption August 19th, 2014

Electrical engineers take major step toward photonic circuits: Team invents non-metallic metamaterial that enables them to 'compress' and contain light August 19th, 2014

Discoveries

Success in Intracellular Imaging of Cesium Distribution in Plants Used for Cesium Absorption August 19th, 2014

Сalculations with Nanoscale Smart Particles August 19th, 2014

Electrical engineers take major step toward photonic circuits: Team invents non-metallic metamaterial that enables them to 'compress' and contain light August 19th, 2014

Graphene rubber bands could stretch limits of current healthcare, new research finds August 19th, 2014

Announcements

Сalculations with Nanoscale Smart Particles August 19th, 2014

Life on Mars? Implications of a newly discovered mineral-rich structure August 19th, 2014

Harris & Harris Group Letter to Shareholders on Website August 19th, 2014

Electrical engineers take major step toward photonic circuits: Team invents non-metallic metamaterial that enables them to 'compress' and contain light August 19th, 2014

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals

Success in Intracellular Imaging of Cesium Distribution in Plants Used for Cesium Absorption August 19th, 2014

Сalculations with Nanoscale Smart Particles August 19th, 2014

Life on Mars? Implications of a newly discovered mineral-rich structure August 19th, 2014

Promising Ferroelectric Materials Suffer From Unexpected Electric Polarizations: Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that impede performance in next-gen materials that could otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices August 18th, 2014

Automotive/Transportation

New Method Provides Nanoscale Details of Electrochemical Reactions in Electric Vehicle Battery Materials August 4th, 2014

A protecting umbrella against oxygen: Toward fuel cells built from renewable and abundant components - Scientists from Bochum und Mülheim report in NATURE Chemistry August 4th, 2014

Stanford researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design: Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes August 1st, 2014

Stanford team achieves 'holy grail' of battery design: A stable lithium anode - Engineers use carbon nanospheres to protect lithium from the reactive and expansive problems that have restricted its use as an anode July 27th, 2014

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics

Could hemp nanosheets topple graphene for making the ideal supercapacitor? August 12th, 2014

Cylinder scanning system used in the ZylScan-System of the Breitmeier Messtechnik Company August 5th, 2014

Used-cigarette butts offer energy storage solution August 5th, 2014

New Method Provides Nanoscale Details of Electrochemical Reactions in Electric Vehicle Battery Materials August 4th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE