Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > UCSB Researchers Make Headway in Quantum Information Transfer Using Nanomechanical Coupling of Microwave and Optical States

Scanning electron micrograph of the device showing the mechanically suspended optomechanical crystal (blue) with electrodes (yellow) and the photonic circuit (red)
Credit: Joerg Bochmann & Amit Vainsencher, UCSB
Scanning electron micrograph of the device showing the mechanically suspended optomechanical crystal (blue) with electrodes (yellow) and the photonic circuit (red)

Credit: Joerg Bochmann & Amit Vainsencher, UCSB

Abstract:
Fiber optics has made communication faster than ever, but the next step involves a quantum leap -- literally. In order to improve the security of the transfer of information, scientists are working on how to translate electrical quantum states to optical quantum states in a way that would enable ultrafast, quantum-encrypted communications.

UCSB Researchers Make Headway in Quantum Information Transfer Using Nanomechanical Coupling of Microwave and Optical States

Santa Barbara, CA | Posted on September 23rd, 2013

A UC Santa Barbara research team has demonstrated the first and arguably most challenging step in the process. The paper, published in Nature Physics, describes a nanomechanical transducer that provides strong and coherent coupling between microwave signals and optical photons. In other words, the transducer is an effective conduit for translating electrical signals (microwaves) into light (photons).

Today's high-speed Internet converts electrical signals to light and sends it through optical fibers, but accomplishing this with quantum information is one of the great challenges in quantum physics. If realized, this would enable secure communication and even quantum teleportation, a process by which quantum information can be transmitted from one location to another.

"There's this big effort going on in science now to construct computers and networks that work on the principles of quantum physics," says lead author Jörg Bochmann, a postdoctoral scholar in UCSB's Department of Physics. "And we have found that there actually is a way to translate electrical quantum states to optical quantum states."

The new paper outlines the concept and presents a prototype device, which uses an optomechanical crystal implemented in a piezoelectric material in a way that is compatible with superconducting qubits, quantum analogs of classical bits. Operating the device at the single phonon limit, the scientists were able generate coherent interactions between electrical signals, very high frequency mechanical vibrations, and optical signals.

Although the first prototype of the transducer has not been operated in the quantum realm, that is, in fact, the next step for the research effort. "In this paper, we're characterizing the system using classical electrical and optical signals and find that the essential parameters look very promising," says Bochmann. "In the next step, we would have to actually input quantum signals from the electrical side and then check whether the quantum properties are preserved in the light."

According to the authors, their prototype transducer is fully compatible with superconducting quantum circuits and is well suited for cryogenic operation. "The coupled dynamics of the system should be the same at low temperatures as in our room temperature measurements, albeit with a lower thermal background," said co-author Andrew Cleland, a professor of physics and associate director of the California Nanosystems Institute at UCSB. "Genuine quantum features and non-classical mechanical states will emerge when we couple a superconducting qubit to the transducer.

"We believe that combining optomechanics with superconducting quantum devices will enable a new generation of on-chip quantum devices with unique capabilities, as well as opening an exciting pathway for realizing entangled networks of electronic and photonic quantum systems," Cleland said.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Julie Cohen
(805) 893-7220


George Foulsham
(805) 893-3071


FEATURED RESEARCHERS

Jörg Bochmann
805-893-7633


Andrew Cleland
805-893-5401

Copyright © University of California - Santa Barbara

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Cleland Group:

Related News Press

News and information

Researchers identify structural changes that occur in enveloped viruses before invading host August 21st, 2018

Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies: Computer simulations reveal new behavior of antiskyrmions in gradually increased electric currents August 21st, 2018

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature: SCMR effect simplifies the design of fundamental spintronic components August 20th, 2018

Color effects from transparent 3D printed nanostructures: New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D print templates for user-given colors Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference August 18th, 2018

Scientists turn to the quantum realm to improve energy transportation August 17th, 2018

Physics

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature: SCMR effect simplifies the design of fundamental spintronic components August 20th, 2018

Scientists create antilaser for ultracold atoms condensate August 16th, 2018

Yale-NUS scientist and collaborators solve open theoretical problem on electron interactions August 10th, 2018

World-first quantum computer simulation of chemical bonds using trapped ions: Quantum chemistry expected to be one of the first applications of full-scale quantum computers July 25th, 2018

Superconductivity

Superconductivity above 10 K discovered in a novel quasi-one-dimensional compound K2Mo3As3 August 10th, 2018

Lining Up the Surprising Behaviors of a Superconductor with One of the World's Strongest Magnets August 8th, 2018

Chip Technology

Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies: Computer simulations reveal new behavior of antiskyrmions in gradually increased electric currents August 21st, 2018

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature: SCMR effect simplifies the design of fundamental spintronic components August 20th, 2018

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte: Milestone of energy efficiency in information technology -- Publication in Advanced Materials August 17th, 2018

Scientists create antilaser for ultracold atoms condensate August 16th, 2018

Quantum Computing

Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons: Breakthrough in nanoresearch August 9th, 2018

World-first quantum computer simulation of chemical bonds using trapped ions: Quantum chemistry expected to be one of the first applications of full-scale quantum computers July 25th, 2018

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern July 21st, 2018

Tuning into quantum: Scientists unlock signal frequency control of precision atom qubits July 16th, 2018

Discoveries

Researchers identify structural changes that occur in enveloped viruses before invading host August 21st, 2018

Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies: Computer simulations reveal new behavior of antiskyrmions in gradually increased electric currents August 21st, 2018

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature: SCMR effect simplifies the design of fundamental spintronic components August 20th, 2018

Color effects from transparent 3D printed nanostructures: New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D print templates for user-given colors Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference August 18th, 2018

Announcements

Researchers identify structural changes that occur in enveloped viruses before invading host August 21st, 2018

Magnetic antiparticles offer new horizons for information technologies: Computer simulations reveal new behavior of antiskyrmions in gradually increased electric currents August 21st, 2018

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature: SCMR effect simplifies the design of fundamental spintronic components August 20th, 2018

Color effects from transparent 3D printed nanostructures: New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D print templates for user-given colors Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference August 18th, 2018

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Scientists create antilaser for ultracold atoms condensate August 16th, 2018

Breaking down the Wiedemann-Franz law: In a study exploring the coupling between heat and particle currents in a gas of strongly interacting atoms, physicists at ETH Zurich find puzzling behaviours August 10th, 2018

Optical fibers that can 'feel' the materials around them August 7th, 2018

NUST MISIS scientists present metamaterial for solar cells and nanooptics July 23rd, 2018

Quantum nanoscience

How hot is Schrödinger's coffee? August 15th, 2018

Breaking down the Wiedemann-Franz law: In a study exploring the coupling between heat and particle currents in a gas of strongly interacting atoms, physicists at ETH Zurich find puzzling behaviours August 10th, 2018

Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons: Breakthrough in nanoresearch August 9th, 2018

World-first quantum computer simulation of chemical bonds using trapped ions: Quantum chemistry expected to be one of the first applications of full-scale quantum computers July 25th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project