Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Improving Heat Removal Qualities of Graphene: Three Bourns College of Engineering professors will share a $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation

From left, Alexander A. Balandin, Roger Lake and Ashok Mulchandani
From left, Alexander A. Balandin, Roger Lake and Ashok Mulchandani

Abstract:
Three Bourns College of Engineering professors at the University of California, Riverside have received a three-year, $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to further study the thermal properties of graphene, which is expected to lead to new approaches for the removal of heat from advanced electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Improving Heat Removal Qualities of Graphene: Three Bourns College of Engineering professors will share a $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation

Riverside, CA | Posted on August 1st, 2013

Alexander A. Balandin, a professor of electrical engineering and founding chair of the materials science and engineering program, Roger Lake, a professor of electrical engineering, Ashok Mulchandani, a professor of chemical engineering, will be cooperating on the project called: "Two-dimensional performance with three-dimensional capacity: Engineering the thermal properties of graphene."

Balandin will serve as principal investigator and be responsible for materials characterization and thermal measurements. Lake will perform theoretical and computational studies while Mulchandani will conduct material synthesis and characterization.

The unique properties of graphene - a single atomic plane of carbon atoms - were discovered in Balandin's Nano-Device Laboratory at UC Riverside in 2008. In recent years, the attention of the research community was focused on the properties of twisted bilayer graphene - a special form of graphene bilayers where atomic planes are rotated against each other by some angle.

The objective of this grant is to investigate the effect of rotation angle on the thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene. The UCR team will study the possibility of suppressing the phonon coupling in twisted graphene layers, allowing for the transfer of extraordinary large heat fluxes. The phonons are quanta of crystal lattice vibrations that carry heat in graphene.

The possibility of maintaining two-dimensional properties of graphene in bulk materials through the use of twisting the stacking angles is a transformational concept giving us the best of both worlds - the enhanced performance of two-dimensional combined with the capacity of three-dimensional systems.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sean Nealon
Tel: (951) 827-1287

Twitter: seannealon

Copyright © University of California, Riverside

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Get ready for NanoDays! March 5th, 2015

American Chemical Society Presidential Symposia: nanoscience, international chemistry March 5th, 2015

CiQUS researchers obtain high-quality perovskites over large areas by a chemical method March 4th, 2015

Arrowhead to Present at 2015 Barclays Global Healthcare Conference March 4th, 2015

Nanosorbents Increase Extraction, Recycling of Silver from Aqueous Solutions March 4th, 2015

Graphene

New research could lead to more efficient electrical energy storage March 4th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

New research could lead to more efficient electrical energy storage March 4th, 2015

Energy-generating cloth could replace batteries in wearable devices March 4th, 2015

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication March 3rd, 2015

Chip Technology

Experiment and theory unite at last in debate over microbial nanowires: New model and experiments settle debate over metallic-like conductivity of microbial nanowires in bacterium March 4th, 2015

Magnetic vortices in nanodisks reveal information: Researchers from Dresden and Jülich use microwaves to read out information from smallest storage devices March 4th, 2015

Cambrios and Heraeus Jointly Create New, High-Conductivity Transparent Conductors: Two Companies' Combined Products Dramatically Extend Flexible Substrate Capabilities for Next-Generation Mass-Market Technology Products March 3rd, 2015

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Announcements

Get ready for NanoDays! March 5th, 2015

American Chemical Society Presidential Symposia: nanoscience, international chemistry March 5th, 2015

CiQUS researchers obtain high-quality perovskites over large areas by a chemical method March 4th, 2015

Arrowhead to Present at 2015 Barclays Global Healthcare Conference March 4th, 2015

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication March 3rd, 2015

Breakthrough in OLED technology March 2nd, 2015

International research partnership tricks the light fantastic March 2nd, 2015

Imec Demonstrates Compact Wavelength-Division Multiplexing CMOS Silicon Photonics Transceiver March 1st, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE