Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > UA researchers convert cement into an electrical conductor

Abstract:
Researchers at the University of Alicante have developed a cementitious material incorporating carbon nanofibers in its composition, turning cement into an excellent conductor of electricity capable of performing functions beyond its usual structural function.

UA researchers convert cement into an electrical conductor

Valencia, Spain | Posted on July 30th, 2013

This new technology, developed and patented by the UA Civil Engineering Department's Research Group in Multifunctional Concrete Conductors, allows, among other functions, the material to heat up due to the passage of current.

"The technology allows buildings' premises to heat or prevents the formation of ice on infrastructure, such as highways, railways, roads, airstrips and other elements", lecturer Pedro Garcés, head of research, explains.

"To obtain a cementitious compound effective as the heating element, this should have a low resistivity. This is not achieved in conventional concrete because they are poor conductors of electricity. However, this can be achieved by the addition of conductive materials such as, for example, carbonaceous materials", Pedro Garcés adds.

In this way, a new conductive compound with much more interesting properties is achieved since it keeps the structural properties of concrete and does not compromise the durability of the structures themselves.

This new product has a great versatility, since any existing structure or surface can be coated with it, keeping thermal control in it by applying continuous electric current.

At present, the research group has developed trials to test the technology in plasters with carbonaceous materials. These tests have given very satisfactory results, obtaining optimal properties of heating the material with minimum energy consumption.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Lauren Kelly Wickman
+34 963877978

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Superconductor could be realized in a broken Lorenz invariant theory July 7th, 2015

New technique enables magnetic patterns to be mapped in 3-D July 7th, 2015

Crystal structure and magnetism -- new insight into the fundamentals of solid state physics: HZB team decodes relationship between magnetic interactions and the distortions in crystal structure within a geometrically 'frustrated' spinel system July 7th, 2015

Down to the quantum dot: Jülich researchers develop ultrahigh-resolution 3-D microscopy technique for electric fields July 7th, 2015

Discoveries

Superconductor could be realized in a broken Lorenz invariant theory July 7th, 2015

New technique enables magnetic patterns to be mapped in 3-D July 7th, 2015

Crystal structure and magnetism -- new insight into the fundamentals of solid state physics: HZB team decodes relationship between magnetic interactions and the distortions in crystal structure within a geometrically 'frustrated' spinel system July 7th, 2015

Down to the quantum dot: Jülich researchers develop ultrahigh-resolution 3-D microscopy technique for electric fields July 7th, 2015

Announcements

Superconductor could be realized in a broken Lorenz invariant theory July 7th, 2015

New technique enables magnetic patterns to be mapped in 3-D July 7th, 2015

Crystal structure and magnetism -- new insight into the fundamentals of solid state physics: HZB team decodes relationship between magnetic interactions and the distortions in crystal structure within a geometrically 'frustrated' spinel system July 7th, 2015

Down to the quantum dot: Jülich researchers develop ultrahigh-resolution 3-D microscopy technique for electric fields July 7th, 2015

Automotive/Transportation

June 29th, 2015

Buckle up for fast ionic conduction June 16th, 2015

A protective shield for sensitive catalysts: Hydrogels block harmful oxygen June 15th, 2015

Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination June 10th, 2015

Construction

Research findings point way to designing crack-resistant metals June 24th, 2015

Solar cells in the roof and nanotechnology in the walls June 16th, 2015

Production of Nanocomposites by Using Direct Nano-Welding of Micromaterials in Iran June 4th, 2015

Environmental Issues to Hamper Growth of Global Nanocomposites Market June 4th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project