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Home > Press > High performance in miniature format Dolomite presents new range of Piezoelectric Pumps

Dolomite’s new Stainless Steel Piezoelectric Pump with Tube Barbs (Part No. 3200312)
Dolomite’s new Stainless Steel Piezoelectric Pump with Tube Barbs (Part No. 3200312)

Abstract:
Dolomite, a world leader in microfluidic design and manufacture, has launched a new range of self-priming Stainless Steel Piezoelectric Pumps providing a flexible solution for handling of small volumes of fluid within microfluidic systems. Available with and without tube barbs the low power miniature pumps (~7.5mW) benefit a wide range of industries and applications including consumer electronics, medical instruments, fuel cells and microfluidic experimentations.

High performance in miniature format Dolomite presents new range of Piezoelectric Pumps

Royston, UK | Posted on July 17th, 2013

Fabricated from layers of bonded stainless steel foils, the Piezoelectric Pumps offer excellent chemical compatibility and are particularly suited to being supplied in high volume providing a very cost-effective solution for disposable devices. Extremely small in size and lightweight (<1g), they are also ideal for easy integration into experimental set-ups and can be used in portable microfluidic devices. Together with Dolomite's Stainless Steel Piezoelectric Pump Control Board (Part No. 3200313) the compact microfluidic pumps can be controlled and powered through a USB input facilitating instrument development as well as offering increased user flexibility.

Their unique technology uses the piezoelectric effect which converts electrical energy into mechanical energy for the actuation of a stainless steel diaphragm, resulting in fluid movement through the diaphragm chamber. By varying the applied voltage and frequency, users can easily adjust the flow rate from 20μl/min to 2800μl/min and pressure from -10kPa to 90kPa.

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About The Dolomite Centre Limited
Established in 2005 as the world’s first Microfluidic Application Centre, Dolomite focused on working with customers to turn their concepts for microfluidic applications into reality. Today, Dolomite is the world leader in solving microfluidic problems. With offices in the UK and US and distributors throughout the rest of the world, its clients range from universities developing leading-edge analytical equipment, to manufacturers of chemical, life sciences and clinical diagnostics systems.

Dolomite is pioneering the use of microfluidic devices for small-scale fluid control and analysis, enabling manufacturers to develop more compact, cost-effective and powerful instruments. By combining specialist glass, quartz and ceramic technologies with knowledge of high performance microfluidics, Dolomite is able to provide solutions for a broad range of application areas including environmental monitoring, clinical diagnostics, food and beverage, nuclear, agriculture, petrochemical, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Furthermore Dolomite's in-house micro-fabrication facilities that include clean rooms and precision glass processing facilities allow to prototype and test all solutions rapidly which ensures a faster development cycle and reduces the time to market.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
The Dolomite Centre Ltd
1 Anglian Business Park, Orchard Road, Royston, Hertfordshire, SG8 5TW, UK
T: +44 (0)1763 242491
F: +44 (0)1763 246125

Copyright © The Dolomite Centre Limited

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