Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Preventing an immune overreaction

Abstract:
The immune system can run awry in many ways. Some examples of undesirable immune responses include those directed against the host (autoimmunity), transplanted organs (transplant rejection), or a harmless substance (allergies). In each case, the immune system is reacting to the presence of a molecule known as an antigen. Currently, the best treatment options involve broad spectrum suppression of the immune system, which increases susceptibility to infection. A preferable solution would be to specifically turn off the immune cells that respond to non-threatening objects.

Preventing an immune overreaction

La Jolla, CA | Posted on June 3rd, 2013

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Dr. James Paulson and colleagues at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California used antigen-decorated nanoparticles to block the development of antibodies to a immune response-inducing antigens in mice. In an accompanying commentary, Edward Clark of the University of Washington discusses how this finding could lead to therapeutic agents capable of precisely controlling our immune system, allowing favorable responses and inhibiting unfavorable responses.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
James C Paulson
The Scripps Research Institute
La Jolla, CA, USA
Phone: 858-784-9634
Fax: 858-784-9690


Edward A Clark
University of Washington
Seattle, WA, USA
Phone: 206 543-8706


Jillian Hurst

Copyright © Journal of Clinical Investigation

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Download article - "Antigenic liposomes displaying CD22 ligands induce antigen-specific B cell apoptosis"

Download article - "STALing B cell responses with CD22"

Related News Press

News and information

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Cima NanoTech Debuts Large Interactive Touch Screens with European Customers at ISE 2016: For the first time in Europe, Cima NanoTech’s wide range of high performance, projected capacitive touch modules are showcased February 11th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

Leading bugs to the death chamber: A kinder face of cholesterol February 8th, 2016

UTHealth research looks at nanotechnology to help prevent preterm birth February 7th, 2016

Discoveries

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Announcements

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Cima NanoTech Debuts Large Interactive Touch Screens with European Customers at ISE 2016: For the first time in Europe, Cima NanoTech’s wide range of high performance, projected capacitive touch modules are showcased February 11th, 2016

Composite Pipe Long Term Testing Facility February 10th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Research partnerships

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

SUNY Poly and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announce New $500M R&D Program in Albany To Accelerate Next Generation Chip Technology: Arrival of Second Cutting Edge EUV Lithography Tool Launches New Patterning Center That Will Generate Over 100 New High Tech Jobs at SUNY Poly February 9th, 2016

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Nanoscale cavity strongly links quantum particles: Single photons can quickly modify individual electrons embedded in a semiconductor chip and vice versa February 8th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic