Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > How do cold ions slide

Ions on optical latticeCredits: SISSA
Ions on optical lattice

Credits: SISSA

Abstract:
Things not always run smoothly. It may happen, actually, that when an object slides on another, the advancement may occur through a ‘stop and go' series in the characteristic manner which scientists call "stick-slip", a pervasive phenomenon at every scale, from earthquakes to daily-life objects, up to the "nano" dimension. Davide Mandelli, Andrea Vanossi and Erio Tosatti of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste have studied the conditions in which at the nanoscopic level the switch from smooth sliding to stick-slip regime occurs, simulating ‘toy-like' systems of ‘cold ions'.

How do cold ions slide

Trieste, Italy | Posted on May 24th, 2013

"Our studies are based on the research on trapped cold ions. Before we did, such methodology had never been applied to the field of friction", explains Tosatti. "These are experimental studies I call ‘toy-like' because they are models employed to explore reality, in the same way as a Lego little house may be used as the model of a real house. We have simulated such systems and used them in our field of research." Tosatti is the coordinator of the research, which appeared in the scientific journal Physical Review. The study, besides SISSA, also involves the Centro Democritos of Officina dei Materiali CNR-IOM.

More in detail…

The three scientists have simulated the sliding of a one-dimensional ion chain of finite length on a substrate generated by laser beams (an optical lattice).

"The lattice forms a periodic sequence of ‘barriers' and ‘holes', whose depth determines the behavior of the ion chain when advancing on the substrate pulled by an electric field," explains Mandelli, a student at SISSA. When the holes are shallow - technically speaking, when the amplitude of the corrugated potential is small enough - the ion chain can slide in a continuous manner, while when they are deeper the movement of the ions appears more restrained, and thus the stick-slip regime is observed." Another interesting observation" adds Mandelli "regards the role of the chain's inhomogeneity, as a consequence of which some areas get more or less stuck on the substrate. As a consequence, before the sliding process starts, internal ‘adjustments' occur in which few ions move in the direction of the pulling force. Also this phenomenon has been observed at macroscopic scales."

In a 2011 study Tosatti e Vanossi had already employed such model to study static friction. With this work they have extended their observations to the field of dynamics.

"Such studies are important for two reasons", explains Mandelli. "On one side, the stick-slip is a complex phenomenon that occurs at every scale whose dynamics are still little-known. Just try to imagine how important it is to understand it from a geological viewpoint, for instance. On the other, with the development of nanotechnologies also from an application point of view it becomes fundamental to know the details of the interaction mechanics of molecules and atoms."

On the connection between mesoscale and nanoscale friction Tosatti and Vanossi have recently published also a "colloquium" (a series of articles in scientific reviews) in the international journal Reviews of Modern Physics. Such research line carried out at SISSA has been recently awarded with a 5-year Advanced Grant by the European Research Council.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Federica sgorbissa

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Full bibliographic information

Related News Press

News and information

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Physics

Theorists smooth the way to modeling quantum friction: New paradigm offers a strategy for solving one of quantum mechanics' oldest problems May 18th, 2016

How light is detected affects the atom that emits it: An experiment suggests it might be possible to control atoms entangled with the light they emit by manipulating detection May 15th, 2016

Physicists measure van der Waals forces of individual atoms for the first time May 14th, 2016

Atomic force microscope reveals molecular ghosts: Mapping molecules with atomic precision expands toolbox for designing new catalytic reactions May 11th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Programmable materials find strength in molecular repetition May 23rd, 2016

Discoveries

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Announcements

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Photon collisions: Photonic billiards might be the newest game! May 20th, 2016

We’ll Leave the Lights On For You: Photonics advances allow us to be seen across the universe, with major implications for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, says UC Santa Barbara physicist Philip Lubin - See more at: http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2016/016805/we-ll-leave-li May 17th, 2016

UW researchers unleash graphene 'tiger' for more efficient optoelectronics May 16th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic